Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a complete list of allowed characters somewhere, or a rule that determines what can be used in an identifier vs an operator?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

From the haskell report, this is the syntax for allowed symbols:

special    ->   ( | ) | , | ; | [ | ] | `| { | } 
symbol     ->   ascSymbol | uniSymbol<special | _ | : | " | '>
ascSymbol  ->   ! | # | $ | % | & | * | + | . | / | < | = | > | ? | @
                \ | ^ | | | - | ~
uniSymbol  ->   any Unicode symbol or punctuation 

So, symbols are ascii symbols or unicode symbols except from those in special | _ | : | " | ', which are reserved (here a | b means "it may be a or b", and a<b> means "may be everything in a except b"). A few paragraphs below, the report gives the complete definition for haskell operators:

varsym     -> ( symbol {symbol | :})<reservedop | dashes>
consym     -> (: {symbol | :})<reservedop>
reservedop -> .. | : | :: | = | \ | | | <- | -> | @ | ~ | =>

Operator symbols are formed from one or more symbol characters, as defined above, and are lexically distinguished into two namespaces (Section 1.4):

  • An operator symbol starting with a colon is a constructor.
  • An operator symbol starting with any other character is an ordinary identifier.

Notice that a colon by itself, ":", is reserved solely for use as the Haskell list constructor; this makes its treatment uniform with other parts of list syntax, such as "[]" and "[a,b]".

Other than the special syntax for prefix negation, all operators are infix, although each infix operator can be used in a section to yield partially applied operators (see Section 3.5). All of the standard infix operators are just predefined symbols and may be rebound.

share|improve this answer
3  
Should probably be citing the haskell2010 report instead of the haskell98 report these days (although in this case they say the same thing, as far as I can see). –  Ben Millwood May 11 '12 at 10:00

From the Haskell 2010 Report §2.4:

Operator symbols are formed from one or more symbol characters...

§2.2 defines symbol characters as being any of !#$%&*+./<=>?@\^|-~: or "any [non-ascii] Unicode symbol or punctuation".

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting that you can use arbitrary Unicode. So, for instance, λ or ⊗ would be valid Haskell operators? –  Chris Taylor May 11 '12 at 8:57
7  
No, λ is a Unicode letter, not a Unicode symbol or a Unicode punctuation character. So you can't use it as part of an operator name (but you can use it as part of an ordinary identifier). –  dave4420 May 11 '12 at 8:59
    
I expect you could use as a Haskell operator, but I don't know for sure. –  dave4420 May 11 '12 at 9:01
4  
You can. Its generalCategory is MathSymbol (just to make sure, I actually defined an operator (⊗) in ghci, and it was accepted). –  Daniel Fischer May 11 '12 at 9:19
up vote 4 down vote accepted

What I was looking for was the complete list of characters. Based on the other answers, the full list is;

Unicode Punctuation:

Unicode Symbols:

But excluding the following characters with special meaning in Haskell:

(),;[]`{}_:"'
share|improve this answer
4  
Upvoted, but with a caveat: : is permitted in operator names. If it is the first character then the operator names a constructor, otherwise it names a function as normal. –  dave4420 May 16 '12 at 10:08
    
I didn't know about that! –  Peter Hall May 16 '12 at 13:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.