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I have the following code segment:

public void reorder(int fromIndex, int toIndex) {
    getElements().add(toIndex, getElements().remove(fromIndex));
}

Here, the method getElements has the return type List<?>. The remove method has the return type ?, and the add method shows its arguments as int index, ? element. So my assumption was, since the return type of remove method and second argument of add method are the same - ? - the method call must succeed. But, I was wrong, the above code segment results in the error:

The method add(int, capture#17-of ?) 
in the type List<capture#17-of ?> 
is not applicable for the arguments (int, capture#18-of ?)

Here, I don't have any direct access to the list, and I don't know it's original type returned by getElements method. All I want here is to remove the item at fromIndex and put it at toIndex. So, how do I achieve that? Also is there anything wrong with my understanding of the generics?

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1  
List<?> is not a list of any type but a list of the unknown type. No Java type is a subclass of that "type". –  Andreas_D May 11 '12 at 9:06
1  
But getElements() is a method of some object, right? Show code that retrieves that object, maybe there's a way to parameterize the retrieval code, which will resolve the ? into an Object without warnings. –  Marko Topolnik May 11 '12 at 9:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just add a cast that makes that ? concrete:

public void reorder(int fromIndex, int toIndex) {
  final List<Object> els = (List<Object>)getElements();
  els.add(toIndex, els.remove(fromIndex));
}

Since you are just rearranging elements within the list, this will never cause any trouble. But I must say there's something wrong with the design if you are seeing that kind of return value.

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1  
It is still an unsound cast. Come reification, it will break.. and you know that might be any day now. ;) –  Ben Schulz May 11 '12 at 9:54
1  
Sorry, I was joking about reification coming soon. Nonetheless, that cast is unsound. –  Ben Schulz May 11 '12 at 10:43
1  
The cast is unsound because not every List<?> is a List<Object>. It would be better to skip the cast and use wildcard capture. I really do think a better solution is required. Code should reflect meaning, not whatever the compiler needs it to be. –  Ben Schulz May 11 '12 at 11:24
    
@BenSchulz The meaning of the code is "move an item from index x to index y". The type of that item is irrelevant. The list retrieved from getElements is just a List, with no further type information. We could have cast it to a raw type List and the code would be as meaningful as it is now. –  Marko Topolnik May 11 '12 at 11:36
1  
I said code should reflect meaning, not that it must. The machine won't care, but the developers who come after will. Code is read more than written. Have compassion for your readers and write what you mean. –  Ben Schulz May 11 '12 at 12:17

No no no! Use capture:

public void reorder(int fromIndex, int toIndex) {
    reorderWithCapture(getElements());
}

private <E> void reorderWithCapture(List<E> elements) {
    elements.add(toIndex, elements.remove(fromIndex));
}
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This should be the accepted answer. See also ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-jtp04298/index.html#3.0 –  artbristol May 11 '12 at 10:10

The wildcard ? means any (unknown) type, not one specific type. So the compiler can't verify that the any type used in the remove call is the same as the any type used in the getElements and add calls. This is seen from the error message, where the former is described as capture#18-of ? while the latter is capture#17-of ?. These are seen as two different, unrelated types by the compiler.

Since you apparently can't modify the definition of these methods (although they definitely look fishy based on your description), the least worst option here is probably what @Marko suggests: separate the two steps of the process and use a temp variable with a concrete type parameter (Object) to make the compiler happy.

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The compiler will not be entirely happy, it will still mutter an unchecked warning :) There's still chance, though, that the ? could have been resolved by type inference or parametrization of the instance upon which getElements is being called. We can't see that from what OP has posted. –  Marko Topolnik May 11 '12 at 9:10
    
@MarkoTopolnik, indeed there will be an unchecked warning, so your solution is a least worst rather than best option :-) –  Péter Török May 11 '12 at 9:14

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