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How to remove duplicate items from a list using list comprehension? I have following code:

a = [1, 2, 3, 3, 5, 9, 6, 2, 8, 5, 2, 3, 5, 7, 3, 5, 8]
b = []
b = [item for item in a if item not in b]

but it doesn't work, just produces identical list. Why its producing an identical list?

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4  
Because b is empty at the moment you execute if item not in b. The list comprehension is done in memory and the result is assigned to b at the end. –  Felix Kling May 11 '12 at 10:07
    
    
That means list comprehension doesn't work like loop? –  Alinwndrld May 11 '12 at 10:17
    
If you don't want to use a set because you want to preserve the order, look at the unique_everseen iterator in the itertools recipes. Use like this: b = list(unique_everseen(a)) –  Lauritz V. Thaulow May 11 '12 at 10:29
2  
It's kind of a loop, but it generates the result in one go... it's not that surprising either. Whenever you have the expression x = y, then y is evaluated first and then the result is assigned to x. But during evaluation of y, x is not modified. Would you have had the same doubts if you had b = list(item for item in a if item not in b) instead? –  Felix Kling May 11 '12 at 10:29
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's producing an identical list as b contains no elements at run-time. What you'd want it this:

>>> a = [1, 2, 3, 3, 5, 9, 6, 2, 8, 5, 2, 3, 5, 7, 3, 5, 8]
>>> b = []
>>> [b.append(item) for item in a if item not in b]
[None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None]
>>> b
[1, 2, 3, 5, 9, 6, 8, 7]
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8  
Beware of using list comprehensions for side effects. Use a regular for loop instead. –  Lauritz V. Thaulow May 11 '12 at 10:32
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Use groupby:

>>> from itertools import groupby
>>> a = [1, 2, 3, 3, 5, 9, 6, 2, 8, 5, 2, 3, 5, 7, 3, 5, 8]
>>> [k for k, _ in groupby(sorted(a, key=lambda x: a.index(x)))]
[1, 2, 3, 5, 9, 6, 8, 7]

Leave out the key argument if you don't care about which order the value first appeared in the original list, e.g.

>>> [k for k, _ in groupby(sorted(a))]
[1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

You can do some cool things with groupby. To identify items that appear multiple times:

>>> [k for k, v in groupby(sorted(a)) if len(list(v)) > 1]
[2, 3, 5, 8]

Or to build up a frequency dictionary:

>>> {k: len(list(v)) for k, v in groupby(sorted(a))}
{1: 1, 2: 3, 3: 4, 5: 4, 6: 1, 7: 1, 8: 2, 9: 1}

There are some very useful functions in the itertools module: chain, tee and product to name a few!

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The reason that the list is unchanged is that b starts out empty. This means that if item not in b is always True. Only after the list has been generated is this new non-empty list assigned to the variable b.

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1  
If I understand it correctly, that means list comprehension adds items at one go instead of checking and adding each item one at a time like in loop. –  Alinwndrld May 11 '12 at 10:14
1  
@Alinwndrld: I don't think that's a valid conclusion. It only means that the list comprehension is evaluated before the assignment. The list may well be built up in a loop internally. –  Charles Bailey May 11 '12 at 10:46
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Use keys on a dict constructed with values in a as its keys.

b = dict([(i, 1) for i in a]).keys()

Or use a set:

b = [i for i in set(a)]
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If you don't mind using a different technique than list comprehension you can use a set for that:

>>> a = [1, 2, 3, 3, 5, 9, 6, 2, 8, 5, 2, 3, 5, 7, 3, 5, 8]
>>> b = list(set(a))
>>> print b
[1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
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I have looked at set function, just want to know what's wrong with above code and if it could be corrected? –  Alinwndrld May 11 '12 at 10:09
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