Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I get the name of all columns of a table in SQL SERVER 2008?

share|improve this question
2  
Please change the accepted answer. The accepted answer is not very helpful. –  George W Bush Jun 5 '13 at 2:09

10 Answers 10

up vote 138 down vote accepted

You can obtain this information and much, much more by querying the Information Schema views.

This sample query:

SELECT *
FROM Northwind.INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS
WHERE TABLE_NAME = N'Customers'

Can be made over all these DB objects:
- CHECK_CONSTRAINTS
- COLUMN_DOMAIN_USAGE - COLUMN_PRIVILEGES
- COLUMNS
- CONSTRAINT_COLUMN_USAGE
- CONSTRAINT_TABLE_USAGE
- DOMAIN_CONSTRAINTS
- DOMAINS
- KEY_COLUMN_USAGE
- PARAMETERS
- REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS
- ROUTINES
- ROUTINE_COLUMNS
- SCHEMATA
- TABLE_CONSTRAINTS
- TABLE_PRIVILEGES
- TABLES
- VIEW_COLUMN_USAGE
- VIEW_TABLE_USAGE
- VIEWS

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much –  odiseh Jun 28 '09 at 14:15
24  
Don't just link, show –  Wolfwyrd Nov 16 '12 at 10:30
    
what does "N" in "= N'Customers'" stands for ? –  Qbik Jun 10 at 9:11
    
Qbik "N" if for handlling unicode string like varchar in ANSI(32bit) and nvarchar in unicode(64bit) –  thatsalok Jun 25 at 12:36

You can use the stored procedure sp_columns which would return information pertaining to all columns for a given table. More info can be found here http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms176077.aspx

You can also do it by a SQL query. Some thing like this should help -

 SELECT * FROM sys.columns WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID('dbo.yourTableName') 

I hope this helps.

cheers

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much –  odiseh Jun 30 '09 at 4:59
4  
a variation on that is: SELECT o.Name, c.Name FROM sys.columns c JOIN sys.objects o ON o.object_id = c.object_id WHERE o.type = 'U' ORDER BY o.Name, c.Name All columns from all tables –  Dan Williams May 5 '10 at 19:27
select *
from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS
where TABLE_NAME='tablenName'

This is better than getting from "sys.columns" because it shows DATA_TYPE directly.

share|improve this answer

You can use sp_help in sql server 2008.

sp_help <table_name>;

Keyboard short for the above command select table name (highlight it) and press ALT + F1

share|improve this answer

By using this query you get the answer:

select Column_name 
from Information_schema.columns 
where Table_name like 'table name'
share|improve this answer
SELECT column_name, data_type, character_maximum_length, table_name,ordinal_position, is_nullable 
FROM information_schema.COLUMNS WHERE table_name LIKE 'YOUR_TABLE_NAME'
ORDER BY ordinal_position
share|improve this answer

--This is another variation used to document a large database for conversion (Edited to --remove static columns)

SELECT o.Name                   as Table_Name
     , c.Name                   as Field_Name
     , t.Name                   as Data_Type
     , t.length                 as Length_Size
     , t.prec                   as Precision_
FROM syscolumns c 
     INNER JOIN sysobjects o ON o.id = c.id
     LEFT JOIN  systypes t on t.xtype = c.xtype  
WHERE o.type = 'U' 
ORDER BY o.Name, c.Name

--In the left join, c.type is replaced by c.xtype to get varchar types

share|improve this answer
    
doesn't return varchars –  JumpingJezza Feb 21 '12 at 5:39

This SO question is missing the following approach :

-- List down all columns of table 'Logging'
select * from sys.all_columns where object_id = OBJECT_ID('Logging')
share|improve this answer

It will check whether the given the table is Base Table.

SELECT 
    T.TABLE_NAME AS 'TABLE NAME',
    C.COLUMN_NAME AS 'COLUMN NAME'
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES T
INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS C ON T.TABLE_NAME=C.TABLE_NAME
    WHERE   T.TABLE_TYPE='BASE TABLE'
            AND T.TABLE_NAME LIKE 'Your Table Name'
share|improve this answer
SELECT [name] AS [Column Name]
FROM syscolumns
WHERE id = object_id('TABLE_NAME')
share|improve this answer

protected by Community Feb 8 at 16:00

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.