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I am building a nodejs app with express and mongoose/mongodb.

In order to manage user roles (a user may have 0-n roles), I decided to implement a User schema and a separate Role schema and tie them together like DBRefs and using mongoose populate capability to get from one to the other easily. I chose this structure because I thought this was the best way to answer things like: "Get me a list of users that have X role" or "Get me a list of users whose Y role is set to expire soon".

These are stripped down versions of my schemas for role and user:

RoleSchema = new Schema {
  _user: { type: Schema.ObjectId, ref: 'User' }
  type: String
  expiration: { type: Date, default : '0' }
}

UserSchema = new Schema {
  email: { type: String, index: { unique: true }}      
  roles : [{ type: Schema.ObjectId, ref: 'Role' }]
}

With this, I am able to create/fetch/populate users and roles from within my express scripts without a problem. When I want to add a role to a user, I create the role, save it and then push it to the roles array of the user and then save the user. So, what happens in mongoDB is that each schema has its own collection, and they point to each other through an id field.

Now, what I want to do next is implement boolean-type methods on my schema to check for role-related issues, so that I can do things like

if(user.isActiveSubscriber())

I thought that I would be able to accomplish this simply by adding a method to my User schema, like this:

UserSchema.method "isActiveSubscriber", ->
  result = false
  now = new Date()
  @roles.forEach (role) ->
    result = true  if role.type is "SUBSCRIBER" and role.expiration > now
 result

My problem is that roles are coming out with empty attributes. I suppose it makes sense, since my user collection only has the id of the role but the actual attributes are stored in another collection.

So, here go the questions:

a) Is there a way to load the roles attributes from within my user schema method? I tried calling populate inside the method, but got an error that the user object doesnt know any populate method. I also tried doing a Role.findById() from inside the method but also get an error (tried with Role and RoleSchema)

b) In case there is not a way ... should I simply add the code to check in my scripts? I hate having to put this kind of logic mixed with application logic/flow. Is there a better option?

c) Was it a bad idea to separate these collections in two? Am I completely missing the point of NoSQL? Would it be better if roles were simply an array of embedded documents stored as part of the user collection?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Let me answer your questions:

a) What you can do is to load roles inside your call. Assuming you did

Role = mongoose.model('Role', RoleSchema)

you just need to run

Role.where('_id').in(user.roles).run( (err, res) ->
    /* you have roles in res now */
)

this however is an asynchronous operation, which requires callback to be passed to your method, i.e.

UserSchema.method "isActiveSubscriber", (callback) ->
    now = new Date()
    if @roles.length is 0
        return callback(false)
    if @roles[0].type
        /* roles are loaded,
           maybe there is some other fancy way to do the check */
        result = false
        @roles.forEach (role) ->
            if role.type is "SUBSCRIBER" and role.expiration > now
                result = true
        callback(result)
    else
        /* we have to load roles */
        Role.where('_id').in(@roles).run( (err, res) =>
            /* you have roles in res now */
            /* you may want to populate the field,
               note => sign in this function definition */
            @roles = res 
            result = false
            res.forEach (role) ->
                if role.type is "SUBSCRIBER" and role.expiration > now
                    result = true
            callback(result)
        )

Now for a user user you can call it like this

user.isActiveSubscriber( (result) ->
    /* do something with result */
)

The problem is that the operation is asynchronous and it forces additional callback nesting in your code (this will be pain if you want to check for roles for say 100 users, you will need some asynchronous calls handling library like async). So I advice populating this field whenever you load users and use the code you showed us. You can add static method (maybe you can even override default find method? I'm not sure about this though) for this.

b+c) The other option is to store roles as strings in your collection and hardcode possible roles in app. This will be simplier to implement, however adding/removing new role will be a pain in the $%^&*. The way you are doing this (i.e. via references) is fine and I think that the only thing you need is to populate the field whenever you search for users and everything will be fine.

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thanks a lot. will try this. –  Pedro Galván Kondo May 23 '12 at 2:32

The approach adopted is within the purview of how mongoose implements DBRef-like behavior using populate. However some things seem to have been missed out. Not sure if these details have already been take care and not shown for brevity. Will run through the complete set of steps:

RoleSchema = new Schema {
   type: String
   expiration: { type: Date, default : '0' }
}

UserSchema = new Schema {
   email: { type: String, index: { unique: true }}      
   _roles : [{ type: Schema.ObjectId, ref: 'Role' }] // array of pointers for roles
}

Role = mongo.model('Role', 'RoleSchema');
User = mongo.model('User', 'UserSchema');

var life_sub = new Role({ type: 'LIFE_SUBSCRIBER', .... });
var daily_sub = new Role({ type: 'DAILY_SUBSCRIBER', .... });
var monthly_sub = new Role({ type: 'MONTHLY_SUBSCRIBER', .... });

var jane = new User({email: 'jane@ab.com', _roles: [daily_sub, monthly_sub]});

Add users as required. Next to find the specified user and the corresponding set of roles use:

User
 .find({email:'jane@ab.com'})
 .populate('_roles[]')
 .run(function(err, user)

Now user is an array of pointers corresponding to the roles of the user specified. Iterate through the array and find each role for the user and the corresponding expiration date. Compare with Date.now() to arrive at which roles have expired for the particular user.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
If I call populate from within my application logic, that works fine. But I think it is a better design decision to do it from a schema function so that whenever I want to check the role of a given user (like for example the current user in the session) I could do a simple: if (sessionUser.isActiveSubscriber()) ... rather than having to put the code to validate a role, mixed with my application logic. –  Pedro Galván Kondo May 23 '12 at 2:28

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