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If i construct a binary search tree adding the following values in order:

 10, 7, 16, 12, 5, 11, 2, 20, 1, 14

I get a tree of height 5. Is there a method (other than trial and error) that I can use to determine an ordering of the integers that would create a tree of height 4?

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1  
You need the Balancing Binary Tree –  ie. May 11 '12 at 11:17
1  
possible duplicate of Balancing a Binary Tree (AVL) –  Flexo May 11 '12 at 11:18
4  
I am not looking to construct a balanced tree as such, more determine an ordering of the integers that would get a height of 4. –  Tobi3 May 11 '12 at 11:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I haven't thought this through completely, but one way of getting a tree of specific depth is to sort your elements before inserting them: i.e. sorting then inserting N elements into a binary search tree will produce a tree of depth N.

You might be able to:

  1. Sort your elements
  2. Insert a specific K=4 of them to produce a tree of depth K
  3. Insert the remaining elements in such a way that the tree doesn't get deeper.

(Of course, choosing which K elements to start with and a strategy for inserting the remaining elements is the tricky part -- but maybe this would be a start?)


Edit: I think a general solution is possible, assuming K is big enough. How about this:

  1. Given 10, 7, 16, 12, 5, 11, 2, 20, 1, 14
  2. Sort your elements: 1, 2, 5, 7, 10, 11, 12, 14, 16, 20
  3. Insert the last K=4 elements, then the last K-1, then K-2, and so on, down to 1.

For example, after sorting and inserting the last 4:

12
  \
   14
     \
      16
        \
         20

...then after inserting the last 3:

  12
 /  \
7    14
 \     \
  10    16
    \     \
     11    20

...then after the last 2:

    12
   /  \
  7    14
 / \     \
2   10    16
 \    \     \
  5    11    20

...and finally, after inserting the last element:

      12
     /  \
    7    14
   / \     \
  2   10    16
 / \    \     \
1   5    11    20

...you're left with a BST of height K=4.

Note that this approach will only work when K is big enough -- specifically, when K(K+1)/2 >= N.

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Where do you get the 18 in the binary tree? –  Phpdevpad May 11 '12 at 18:28
    
@Chibox: sorry, typo. Should be fixed now. –  Nate Kohl May 11 '12 at 18:33
    
I don't think your method works on all cases. Say we have a tree with the numbers 1-7. If we use your method we insert 5,6,7 then 3,4 then 2, then 1. The final result is a tree of height 4 with 5 as the root node. However, its possible to arrange 7 nodes as a perfectly balanced binary tree with height 3, if we use 4 as the root node. –  hugomg May 11 '12 at 21:35
    
@missingno: true, this approach only works when K is big enough. I've updated the answer. –  Nate Kohl May 12 '12 at 10:21
    
@NateKohl: No, your approach will always have a counter example. The example I gave of a perfectly filled tre with 2^h - 1 elements extends to all h as well. We know that there is only one way to have this dense tree to stay balanced and in order to do that you need the larger half of the elements to include the root node and the (densily packed) right subtree. If you insert them in order like you suggested you end up with just a spine and it will not be enough. –  hugomg May 12 '12 at 21:45

Yes, you can first construct a perfectly balanced tree and you can then output the nodes in a way that has the parent nodes being printed before their children.

To create a perfectly balanced tree, just sort the numbers and then use recursive binary divisions to build a tree.


For example, in your case we would sort the numbers

 1 2 5 7 10 11 12 14 16 20

and then build a balanced tree from them (take the middle number as the root and repeat this process recursively)

            11
     5            14
 1     7       12    16
   2     10             20

We can now use a preorder traversal or a breadth-first traversal to print the nodes in an order you want (as long as we output the parent nodes before the children we will be fine).

11 5 14 1 7 12 16 2 10 20
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