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I'm currently developing an ASP .NET MVC 3 web application as a prototype with Code First as the data access layer. Right now I'm a bit confused where to put my code.

I have a class Customer and a class project. A project has a navigational property to its customer.

public class Customer
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public class Project
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public virtual Customer Customer { get; set; }
}

I use these two classes for data access with codefirst.

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Customer> Customers { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Project> Projects { get; set; }
}

I learned that it's a best practice to not use these data access classes directly in my MVC views - so I created a ViewModel (CustomerListModel) and a DTO for a single Customer.

public class CustomerDto
{        
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int ProjectCount { get; set; } <== this property is in question
}

public class CustomerListModel
{
    public List<CustomerDto> Customers;
}

In my controller I'm fetching the customers from a (service-)class which does the actual data access.

public class CustomerService : IDisposable
{
    private MyContext db;
    public CustomerService()
    {
        db = new MyContext();
    }

    public IEnumerable<Customer> GetAllCustomers()
    {
        return db.Customers.ToList<Customer>();
    }
}

In my controller I call the method to Get all customers.

    public ViewResult Index()
    {
        //Mapper.CreateMap<Customer, CustomerDto>();

        var customerList = new List<CustomerDto>();
        foreach (var customer in rep.GetAllCustomers())
        {
            var cust = new CustomerDto();
            cust.Id = customer.Id;
            cust.Name = customer.Name;
            cust.Rate = customer.Rate;
==> cust.ProjectCount = customer.ProjectCount; <=====
            customerList.Add(cust);
        }

        var viewModel = new CustomerListModel()
        {                
            Customers = customerList //Mapper.Map<IEnumerable<Customer>, List<CustomerDto>>(rep.GetAllCustomers())
        };
        return View(viewModel);            
    }

What I'm asking is - where to put for example the ProjectCount for a single customer. I could put it int the Customer-class

    public int ProjectCount
    {
       var db = new MyContext();
       return db.Projects.Where(x => x.Customer.Id == this.Id).Count();
    }

...but then I would have two places with data access - the service class and the customer class.

I could also put this code in my ServiceClass:

    public int GetProjectCount(Customer customer)
    {
        return db.Projects.Where(x => x.Customer.Id == customer.Id).Count();
    }

...but then I had to call it from the controller:

        foreach (var customer in rep.GetAllCustomers())
        {
            var cust = new CustomerDto();
            cust.Id = customer.Id;
            cust.Name = customer.Name;
            cust.Rate = customer.Rate;
            cust.ProjectCount = rep.GetProjectCount(customer); <==
            customerList.Add(cust);
        }

...I could also call this method from my service class from a getter of the customer class.

    public int ProjectCount
    {
        get
        {
            return new CustomerService().GetProjectCount(this);
        }
    }

All of the described approaches work and give me the correct result - BUT I want to do it the right way - How would you do it - or am I totally off the track ;-)?

Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
I'd say - generally OK, even better make an interface ICustomerService (CustomerService would implement the interface) and then use this interface with DI. If you're doing a non-generic repository approach (which may be a bit cumbersome if you have a gazillion tables, but for smaller DB it's quite straightforward, easy to manage and debug), I'd put the GetProjectCount(int customerId) as a method in the interface. – Patryk Ćwiek May 11 '12 at 11:52
    
Just to clarify that I understand you correctly: implement CustomerService from ICustomerService - implement the method GetProjectCount in CustomerService and then inject what (the DbContext?)? Then use the GetProjectCount from my controller where I pull the data? – Jetro223 May 11 '12 at 12:29
    
Inject the whole ICustomerService. In Autofac, it looks like this (in Global.asax): var builder = new ContainerBuilder(); builder.Register(service => new CustomerService()).As<ICustomerService>().InstancePerHttpRequest(); ... . Then in the controller's constructor you pass ICustomerService as a parameter, assign it to the controller's member and voila, you can use the repository. :) And yes, then you can use the member to call GetProjectCount in the controller. – Patryk Ćwiek May 11 '12 at 12:39
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The following is my take on it, just to recap what I wrote in comments. I can't say if it's "THE way to go", but I'd like to think it's a viable solution.

So, if you're using non-generic approach, which is (as I mentioned) straightforward, easy to manage and debug for small databases with few tables, you can do it as following:

public interface ICustomerService
{
    IEnumerable<Customer> GetAllCustomers();
    // and other methods you'd like to use
}

public sealed class CustomerService : ICustomerService
{
    private YourContext context = new YourContext();
    // or, alternatively, even something along these lines
    private YourContext context;
    public CustomerService()
    {
        context = ContextFactory.GetDBContext();
    }
    //----

    public IEnumerable<Customer> GetAllCustomers()
    {
         // here goes the implementation
    }
}

public class YourController : Controller
{
    private ICustomerService customerService;
    public YourController(ICustomerService service)
    {
          customerService = service;
    }
    // and now you can call customerService.GetAllCustomers() or whatever other methods you put in the interface. 
}

Digression - the database context factory could look like that, in case you'd like to e.g. change the database connection later on:

public static ContextFactory
{
    public static YourContext GetDBContext()
    {
         return new YourContext();
    }        
}

Of course such easy setup works with any IoC container of choice, mine is Autofac for web-apps, where this goes in the Global.asax Application_Start:

var builder = new ContainerBuilder();
    builder.Register(service => new CustomerService()).As<ICustomerService>().InstancePerHttpRequest();
    builder.RegisterControllers(typeof(MvcApplication).Assembly);
    var container = builder.Build();
    DependencyResolver.SetResolver(new AutofacDependencyResolver(container));

The dependency injection makes it easier to test the controllers later on, since you can mock the database access with anything (e.g. list of prepared items) using one of many mock helpers.

But then, if most of your repositories' methods are alike, you might want to take a look at more general solution (it's for database-first, but can be applied to code-first too) which will be more suited for your needs so you don't have to repeat the code, but then - the code may seem a little bit more complicated. :)

share|improve this answer
    
Proper SoC, IoC, it's all here. This is how I build as well, and its not failed me yet. Saved my bacon several times too, when you need to add features that are cross cutting concerns. – Chad Ruppert May 11 '12 at 13:17
    
Thank you for your comments and your precise description in you answer - I'll try it the way you described. – Jetro223 May 11 '12 at 16:54

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