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My C# application uses the COM ports. I am having some difficulty that should be common to most programs. I need to get an event when the list of Portnames changes. I have a selection box where the user can choose from teh list of available port names. Does anyone have a snippet of code for this? Thank You.

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1  
I'd guess there's a general 'new USB device' or 'new PNP device' system event you could watch, but you might need to wait a second for the device to finish initialising before the new COM ports appeared, though. –  Rup May 11 '12 at 11:46

3 Answers 3

COM ports changing is a rare event, not a common one.

The easiest way would be to have a timer and every 10-30 seconds enumerate the list of COM ports and if changed, update the list.

Better still, provide a "refresh list" button - the list will basically only change if the user has plugged a USB Serial adapter in.

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2  
codeproject.com/Articles/60579/… will show you how to listen for USB attach/detach events. Also, 10-30 seconds is probably too long for the user, +1 vote for the refresh button. –  Simon May 11 '12 at 11:45

It can also be done with help of "ManagementEventWatcher":

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Collections.ObjectModel;
using System.ComponentModel.Composition;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Management;
using System.IO.Ports;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace HmxFlashLoader
{
/// <summary>
/// Make sure you create this watcher in the UI thread if you are using the com port list in the UI
/// </summary>
[Export]
[PartCreationPolicy(CreationPolicy.Shared)]
public sealed class SerialPortWatcher : IDisposable
{
    public SerialPortWatcher()
    {
        _taskScheduler = TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext();
        ComPorts = new ObservableCollection<string>(SerialPort.GetPortNames().OrderBy(s => s));

        WqlEventQuery query = new WqlEventQuery("SELECT * FROM Win32_DeviceChangeEvent");

        _watcher = new ManagementEventWatcher(query);           
        _watcher.EventArrived += (sender, eventArgs) => CheckForNewPorts(eventArgs);
        _watcher.Start();       
    }

    private void CheckForNewPorts(EventArrivedEventArgs args)
    {
        // do it async so it is performed in the UI thread if this class has been created in the UI thread
        Task.Factory.StartNew(CheckForNewPortsAsync, CancellationToken.None, TaskCreationOptions.None, _taskScheduler);
    }

    private void CheckForNewPortsAsync()
    {
        IEnumerable<string> ports = SerialPort.GetPortNames().OrderBy(s => s);

        foreach (string comPort in ComPorts)
        {
            if (!ports.Contains(comPort))
            {
                ComPorts.Remove(comPort);
            }
        }

        foreach (var port in ports)
        {           
            if (!ComPorts.Contains(port))
            {
                AddPort(port);
            }
        }
    }

    private void AddPort(string port)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < ComPorts.Count; j++)
        {
            if (port.CompareTo(ComPorts[j]) < 0)
            {
                ComPorts.Insert(j, port);
                break;
            }
        }

    }

    public ObservableCollection<string> ComPorts { get; private set; }

    #region IDisposable Members

    public void Dispose()
    {
        _watcher.Stop();    
    }

    #endregion

    private ManagementEventWatcher _watcher;
    private TaskScheduler _taskScheduler;
}

}

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Create a simple Form application and put the following code into the form:

protected override void WndProc(ref Message m)
{
    switch (m.Msg)
    {
        case 537: //WM_DEVICECHANGE
            var ports = SerialPort.GetPortNames().OrderBy(name => name);

            foreach (var portName in ports)
            {
                Debug.Print(portName);
            }
            break;
    }
    base.WndProc(ref m);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can this work inside a Windows Service message pump? OS: Win7. If not, then any workaround? –  Adrian Salazar Dec 20 '12 at 22:09
    
@AdrianSalazar: Don't know, never tried. But i don't see any reason why it should not work. Simply try it out and if it doesn't work, ask a new question with your issue. –  Oliver Dec 21 '12 at 7:33
    
The tiny little "override" keyword is the one I'm worried about. Never ever saw this specific method inside a Windows Service, so, noting to override. –  Adrian Salazar Dec 21 '12 at 8:40
    
@AdrianSalazar: You're right. In this case take a look at this SO question. –  Oliver Dec 21 '12 at 11:09

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