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In my GWT app I have a datatype (intended for building and tracking hierarchies of like objects) that extends a superclass, which in turn extends another, abstract superclass. There is a generic parameter declared in the abstract class which is then specified by each subclass as the type of itself. The structure is as follows:

public abstract class AbstractFoo<T extends AbstractFoo> {
     protected T parent;

     protected AbstractFoo(T parent){
          if (parent != null) parent.addChild(this);
          this.parent = parent;
     }
     //...
}

public class Foo<T extends Foo> extends AbstractFoo<T> {
     public Foo(T parent){
          super(parent);
          //...
     }
}

public class SpecialFoo<T extends SpecialFoo> extends Foo<T> {
     public SpecialFoo(T parent){
          super(parent);
          //...
     }
}

When I pass a parent argument to the constructor of SpecialFoo, the constructor of Foo will be called as a superconstructor, and that constructor will in turn call the constructor of AbstractFoo as a superconstructor.

The problem I have is that the parent argument gets reset to NULL when passed from Foo to AbstractFoo. I have no idea why this happens. Can anyone tell me what I need to do in order to pass it through to the abstract base class unharmed?


EDIT: I think I've solved it... The trick seems to be that I have to declare the parent argument in each subclass, so that there is a more specific reference to it, like so:

 public abstract class AbstractFoo<T extends AbstractFoo> {
      protected T parent;

      protected AbstractFoo(T parent){
           if (parent != null) parent.addChild(this);
           this.parent = parent;
      }
      //...
 }

 public class Foo<T extends Foo> extends AbstractFoo<T> {
      protected T parent;

      public Foo(T parent){
           super(parent);
           //...
      }
 }

 public class SpecialFoo<T extends SpecialFoo> extends Foo<T> {
      private SpecialFoo parent;

      public SpecialFoo(T parent){
           super(parent);
           //...
      }
 }
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1  
Seems very unlikely to me. Please show a short but complete example demonstrating the problem. –  Jon Skeet May 11 '12 at 12:40

2 Answers 2

Review these points:

  1. Prove POSITIVELY that you are receiving a null argument in the constructor (print it);
  2. Check for other constructors in your classes. You may be calling a constructor you are not expecting to call, especially due to the generic type of that argument.
share|improve this answer
    
The argument is definitely not null when I pass it in, and null when it arrives in the base constructor. Also, none of the three classes in question have any other constructor in the code. –  dzirique May 11 '12 at 13:04
    
By what means did you ascertain that? It is preferable if you can show the code that prints those results. Define static T spy(T x) { System.out.println("x = " + x); return x; } and call it in the super calls, as well as in the base class constructor. –  Marko Topolnik May 11 '12 at 13:17
    
By logging the value of parent to the GWT development mode console. –  dzirique May 11 '12 at 13:26
    
Your method of logging doesn't seem to work because T can't be referenced in a non-static context in the abstract class –  dzirique May 11 '12 at 13:26
    
Wait -- you are not running this as Java, but compiling into Javascript, and then running that? That would change everything. –  Marko Topolnik May 11 '12 at 13:33

Have you checked that your parent is non null you give your SpecialFoo constructor?

share|improve this answer
    
When I'm debugging, the parent is not null in the SpecialFoo constructor and in the Foo constructor, but it is indeed null in the AbstractFoo constructor. –  dzirique May 11 '12 at 13:03
    
So then please try to write the smallest possible example causing the problem. You may find the problem yourself while melting your code down. –  philnate May 11 '12 at 13:18

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