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So i have been designig an application to run on the Zend Framework 1.11 And as any programmer would do when he sees repeated functionalities i wanted to go build a base class with said functionalities.

Now my plan is to build a library 'My' so i made a folder in the library directory in the application. So it looks like this

Project 
   Application 
   docs 
   library 
      My 
   public 
   test

So i created a BaseController class in the My folder and then decided to have the IndexController in my application extend the BaseController.

The Basecontroller looks like this :

class My_BaseController extends Zend_Controller_Action
{

    public function indexAction()
    {
        $this->view->test = 'Hallo Wereld!';
    }

}

And the IndexController looks like this :

class WMSController extends My_BaseController
{

    public function indexAction()
    {
        parent::indexAction();
    }

}

As adviced by a number of resources i tried adding the namespace for the library in the application.ini using the line

autoloadernamespaces.my = “My_”

But when i try to run this application i recieve the following error

Fatal error: Class 'My_BaseController' not found in C:\wamp\www\ZendTest\application\controllers\IndexController.php

Am i missing something here? Or am i just being a muppet and should try a different approach?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your original approach will work for you in application.ini, you just had a couple of problems with your set up.

Your application.ini should have this line:-

autoloadernamespaces[] = "My_"

Also, you have to be careful with your class names, taking your base controller as an example, it should be in library/My/Controller/Base.php and should look like this:-

class My_Controller_Base extends Zend_Controller_Action
{
    public function indexAction()
    {
        $this->view->test = 'Hello World!';
    }
}

You can then use it like this:-

class WMSController extends My_Controller_Base
{
    public function indexAction()
    {
        parent::indexAction();
    }  
}

So, you had it almost right, but were missing just a couple of details. It is worth getting to know how autoloading works in Zend Framework and learning to use the class naming conventions

share|improve this answer
1  
Just a quick note that it is almost always a bad idea to extend Zend_Controller_Action - it is generally better to create helpers or plugins. I have never found a use case for extending Zend_Controller_Action that could not be more easily tested/injected with a mixture of resources, helpers and plugins. – shrikeh May 11 '12 at 17:05
    
Yes, I agree with you 100%, but this question is about adding your own library and it seemed easier to use the OP's own example. It's probably good to have the comment here though, thanks. – vascowhite May 12 '12 at 9:18
    
Thanks for the responces to my question. I am quite new to how the Zend Framework works and therefor not aquainted with the best practices commonly used. @Shrikeh, i will have a more detailed look at helpers and plugins, thanks for the warning :) – Björn May 14 '12 at 8:46

I don't know about .ini configuration, but I add customer libraries like this (index.php):

require_once 'Zend/Loader/Autoloader.php';
Zend_Loader_Autoloader::getInstance()->registerNamespace('My_');
share|improve this answer
    
Actually that was a typo on my part and i corrected it in the above question :) – Björn May 11 '12 at 12:51
    
Good, see my edition. May be it'll help you. – plutov.by May 11 '12 at 12:55
    
It works! Thanks alot :) – Björn May 11 '12 at 13:00

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