Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a variable like this:

words="这是一条狗。"

I want to make a for loop on each of the characters, one at a time, e.g. first character="这", then character="是", character="一", etc.

The only way I know is to output each character to separate line in a file, then use while read line, but this seems very inefficient.

  • How can I process each character in a string through a for loop?
share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

With sed on dash shell of LANG=en_US.UTF-8, I got the followings working right:

$ echo "你好嗎 新年好。全型句號" | sed -e 's/\(.\)/\1\n/g'
你
好
嗎

新
年
好
。
全
型
句
號

and

$ echo "Hello world" | sed -e 's/\(.\)/\1\n/g'
H
e
l
l
o

w
o
r
l
d

Thus, output can be looped with while read ... ; do ... ; done

edited for sample text translate into English:

"你好嗎 新年好。全型句號" is zh_TW.UTF-8 encoding for:
"你好嗎"     = How are you[ doing]
" "         = a normal space character
"新年好"     = Happy new year
"。全型空格" = a double-byte-sized full-stop followed by text description
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice effort on UTF-8. I didn't need it, but you get my upvote anyway. –  Jordan Aug 19 '13 at 20:27
    
+1 You can use the for loop on the resulting string from sed. –  Tyzoid Jan 25 at 19:24
add comment

Another approach, if you don't care about whitespace being ignored:

for char in $(sed -E s/'(.)'/'\1 '/g <<<"$your_string"); do
    # Handle $char here
done
share|improve this answer
add comment

You can use a traditional for loop:

foo=string
for (( i=0; i<${#foo}; i++ )); do
  echo ${foo:$i:1}
done

${#foo} expands to the length of foo. ${foo:$i:1} expands to the substring starting at position $i of length 1.

share|improve this answer
6  
+1 this is the best answer. For one thing, it's non-destructive. –  Dennis Williamson May 12 '12 at 1:54
add comment

I've only tested this with ascii strings, but you could do something like:

while test -n "$words"; do
   c=${words:0:1}     # Get the first character
   echo character is $c
   words=${words:1}   # trim the first character
done
share|improve this answer
add comment

${#var} return the length of var

${var:pos:N} return N characters from pos

like:

$ words="abc"
$ echo ${words:0:1}
a
$ echo ${words:1:1}
b
$ echo ${words:2:1}
c

so it is easy to iterate.

another way:

$ grep -o . <<< "abc"
a
b
c

or

$ grep -o . <<< "abc" | while read letter;  do echo "my letter is $letter" ; done 

my letter is a
my letter is b
my letter is c
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.