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How can I write a class in C# that only returns the "same" instance of an object? Is this effectively a singleton or different? This was mentioned in the book Effective Java 2nd addition.

I use C# 4.0 (no technology barrier).

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Yes, this is the Singleton pattern: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singleton_pattern –  Paul Sasik May 11 '12 at 13:41
    
Well best way, as long as it can stay static is just to have a static class, if not use a singleton pattern, there is many posts here about it already stackoverflow.com/questions/3136008/… –  Tenerezza May 11 '12 at 13:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, this is a Singleton pattern. You'll find an excellent discussion based on our own Jon Skeet's C# implementation here.

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Thanks guys. Just making sure. –  dotnetdev May 11 '12 at 14:11

If your Singleton object is expensive to create, but isn't used every time your application runs, consider using Lazy.

public sealed class LazySingleton
{
    private readonly static Lazy<LazySingleton> instance = 
        new Lazy<LazySingleton>(() => new LazySingleton() );

    private LazySingleton() { }

    public static LazySingleton Instance
    {
        get { return instance.Value; }
    }
}
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using System;

namespace DesignPatterns
{
    public sealed class Singleton
    {
        private static volatile Singleton instance = null;

        private Singleton() { }

        public static Singleton Instance
        {
            get
            {
                if (instance == null)
                   Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref instance, new Singleton(), null);

                return instance;
            }
        }
    }
}
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Scroll down to "Third Version" in yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/singleton.html. –  Jason May 11 '12 at 13:47

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