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I have a file like this:

This is a file with many words.
Some of the words appear more than once.
Some of the words only appear one time.

I would like to generate a two-column list. The first column shows what words appear, the second column shows how often they appear, e.g.:

this@1
is@1
a@1
file@1
with@1
many@1
words3
some@2
of@2
the@2
only@1
appear@2
more@1
than@1
one@1
once@1
time@1 
  • To make this work simpler, prior to processing the list, I will remove all punctuation, and change all text to lowercase letters.
  • Unless there is a simple solution around it, words and word can count as two separate words.

So far, I have this:

sed -i "s/ /\n/g" ./file1.txt # put all words on a new line
while read line
do
     count="$(grep -c $line file1.txt)"
     echo $line"@"$count >> file2.txt # add word and frequency to file
done < ./file1.txt
sort -u -d # remove duplicate lines

For some reason, this is only showing "0" after each word.

How can I generate a list of every word that appears in a file, along with frequency information?

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1  
What have you tried? –  dbaupp May 11 '12 at 13:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Not sed and grep, but tr, sort, uniq, and awk:

% (tr ' ' '\n' | sort | uniq -c | awk '{print $2"@"$1}') <<EOF
This is a file with many words.
Some of the words appear more than once.
Some of the words only appear one time.
EOF

a@1
appear@2
file@1
is@1
many@1
more@1
of@2
once.@1
one@1
only@1
Some@2
than@1
the@2
This@1
time.@1
with@1
words@2
words.@1
share|improve this answer
    
This is quite a nice solution. One thing you may want to do is provide a way of removing trailing periods as well. perhaps inserting | sed -e 's/\.$//g' between tr and sort in your pipeline. –  mgilson May 11 '12 at 17:27
    
I thought about that, but the original post said punctuation would be removed before this step. –  eduffy May 12 '12 at 12:28

Content of the input file

$ cat inputFile.txt
This is a file with many words.
Some of the words appear more than once.
Some of the words only appear one time.

Using sed | sort | uniq

$ sed 's/\.//g;s/\(.*\)/\L\1/;s/\ /\n/g' inputFile.txt | sort | uniq -c
      1 a
      2 appear
      1 file
      1 is
      1 many
      1 more
      2 of
      1 once
      1 one
      1 only
      2 some
      1 than
      2 the
      1 this
      1 time
      1 with
      3 words

uniq -ic will count and ignore case, but result list will have This instead of this.

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This might work for you:

tr '[:upper:]' '[:lower:]' <file |
tr -d '[:punct:]' |
tr -s ' ' '\n' | 
sort |
uniq -c |
sed 's/ *\([0-9]*\) \(.*\)/\2@\1/'
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The sort requires GNU AWK (gawk). If you have another AWK without asort(), this can be easily adjusted and then piped to sort.

awk '{gsub(/\./, ""); for (i = 1; i <= NF; i++) {w = tolower($i); count[w]++; words[w] = w}} END {qty = asort(words); for (w = 1; w <= qty; w++) print words[w] "@" count[words[w]]}' inputfile

Broken out onto multiple lines:

awk '{
    gsub(/\./, ""); 
    for (i = 1; i <= NF; i++) {
        w = tolower($i); 
        count[w]++; 
        words[w] = w
    }
} 
END {
    qty = asort(words); 
    for (w = 1; w <= qty; w++)
        print words[w] "@" count[words[w]]
}' inputfile
share|improve this answer

You could use a hash-table to create a histogram, or maybe use a Trie.

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