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There are 2 parts to this question. To develop applications with ASP.NET that interface with AX 2009, calls to the Business Connector (BusinessConnectorNet.dll) must make a call through the Axapta object like this:

Axapta ax = new Axapta();
ax.LogonAs("ad_username", "domain.com", new NetworkCredential("ad_username",
    "ad_password", "domain.com"), null, null, null, null);

The obvious problem is that the unencrypted/unhashed password is expected to passed in from a login form. This would have already been done by the user on either the DotNetNuke or EasyAD module we purchased (both SqlMembershipProvider based).

The desired result is a single sign-on solution with DotNetNuke 6.

Here is the question:

Is there a recommended solution to obtaining and passing on the unencrypted password, or is there some hidden undocumented Membership methods built-in to the BusinessConnector?

Note: My experience levels are:

  • DotNetNuke 6: Beginner (Have made and installed working modules)
  • ASP.Net: Intermediate
  • C#: Advanced
  • AX 2009: Intermediate
  • Business Connector: Intermediate

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1 Answer 1

Is there a recommended solution to obtaining and passing on the unencrypted password

You don't do this forward the encrypted ( actually hashed ) password instead.

is there some hidden undocumented Membership methods built-in to the BusinessConnector?

Unlikely. This is better left up to ASP.NET

I don't understand the problem to be honest. Your approach seems an intial attempt and it seems you simply stopped there. There really isn't any code I can provide since you asked Yes and No questions.

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The gist is this: I don't want to capture the password, for security reasons, but the Business Connector for AX isn't a MembershipProvider friendly piece of code. It expects a plain-text password to be coming in for it's own exposed login procedure. How's this for a follow-up question: Any ideas for how I can work around this? –  C. Griffin May 11 '12 at 18:55

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