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I have a fairly vanilla web service (old school asmx). One of the methods kicks off some async processing that has no bearing on the result returned to the client. Hopefully, the little snippet below makes sense:

[System.Web.Services.WebMethod]
public List<Foo> SampleWebMethod(string id)
{
    // sample db query
    var foo = db.Query<Foo>("WHERE id=@0",id);

    // kick of async stuff here - for example firing off emails
    // dont wait to send result
    DoAsyncStuffHere();

    return foo;

}

My initial implementation for the DoAsyncStuffHere method made use of the ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem. So, it looks something like:

public void DoAsyncStuffHere()
{
    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(delegate
    {
        // DO WORK HERE
    });
}

This approach works fine under low load conditions. However, I need something that can handle a fairly high load. So, the producer/consumer pattern would seem to be the best way to go.

Where I am confused is how to constrain all work being done by the queue to a single thread across all instances of the web service. How would I best go about setting up a single queue to be accessed by any instance of the web service?

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When you say "across all instances of the web service", do you mean one process with multiple request handling threads, or do you mean multiple copies of this ASP.NET project running separately, like in a load balancing setup? –  mbeckish May 11 '12 at 14:32
    
just the one process with multiple request handling threads. –  user163757 May 12 '12 at 0:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use a System.Collections.Concurrent.BlockingCollection<T> with a System.Collections.Concurrent.ConcurrentQueue<T> as the underlying collection.
As the name of the namespace implies, the collections are thread safe.

Start a consumer thread (or a few) to pull items from the collection, using the Take() method. When no items are available, the thread will block.

Your DoAsyncStuffHere method adds items to the BlockingCollection. These items could be unstarted System.Threading.Tasks.Task objects; the consumer thread(s) would in that case Start the tasks after taking them from the collection.

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You can't do this with ThreadPool - you could have a static constructor which launches a worker Thread; the DoAsyncStuffHere could insert its work item to a Queue of work that you want done, and the worker Thread can check if there are any items in the Queue to work on. If so, it does the work, otherwise it sleeps for a few millis.

The static constructor ensures that it's only called once, and only a single Thread should be launched (unless there's some bizarre .NET edge case that I'm unaware of).

Here's a layout for an example - you'd probably need to implement some locking on the queue and add a bit more sophistication to the worker thread, but I've used this pattern before with success. The WorkItem object can hold the state of the information that you want passed along to the worker thread.

public static WebService() 
{
  new Thread(WorkerThread).Start();
  WorkQueue = new Queue<WorkItem>();
}

public static void WorkerThread() 
{
  while(true)
  {
    if(WorkQueue.Any()) 
    {
      WorkQueue.Dequeue().DoWork();
    }
    else
    {
      Thread.Sleep(100);
    }
  }
}

public static Queue<WorkItem> WorkQueue { get; set; }

[System.Web.Services.WebMethod]
public List<Foo> SampleWebMethod(string id)
{
  WorkQueue.Queue(newWorkItem());
}
share|improve this answer
    
this is a perfectly good solution. The only reason I didnt choose this as the answer is the accepted answer is actually built right into .net 4.0. thanks though. –  user163757 May 12 '12 at 0:55
    
Thanks - @phoog's answer is way better and I'm glad to have learned it now –  eouw0o83hf May 12 '12 at 14:18

One easy way to do it would be to implement your queue as a database table.

The producers would be the request threads handled by each instance of the web service.

The consumer could be any kind of continuously running process (Windows Forms app, Windows service, database job, etc.) that monitors the queue and processes items one at a time.

share|improve this answer
1  
That will work, but the downside of this approach is that there's much more maintenance than doing it inside the already-existing service: a new database/table to maintain; another service to develop, QA and deploy; another process on the server to worry about. –  eouw0o83hf May 11 '12 at 14:27
    
Yes, but you get all of the inter-process communication and concurrency handling built for you (the DBMS handles all of it). Otherwise, if you have the web service running on 2 different servers, which instance of the service will host the queue, how will you handle communication between the two servers, etc. –  mbeckish May 11 '12 at 14:49

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