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I'm having a hard time with current project. In previous versions I used std::vectors and all went fine, no memory leaks, no errors, just fine.

Then I switched to use some pointers since it's just more elegant and I have improved performance a bit.

So I have classes like

class A
{
    private:
        std::string str;
    public:
        A() {str = "";}
};

class B
{
    private:
        std::string str;
        A* a;
    public:
        B() {str = ""; a = NULL; }
};

class C
{
    private:
        std::vector<B*> bs;
    public:
        C() { bs = std::vector<B*>(); }

};

I know that every time I use new, I have to delete it afterwards. So I create destructors for class B and class C.

That's what I think it should look like:

B::~B()
{
    if ( this->a != NULL )
        delete this->a;
}

C::~C()
{
    while ( (this->bs).size() > 0 )
    {
        if ( (this->bs).back() != NULL )
            delete (this->bs).back();
        (this->bs).pop_back();
    }
    (this->bs).clear(); // not necessary since bs has size 0?
}

But with that, I'm getting various errors, such as "Invalid read of size 4" in valgrind.

Is my idea of what destructors should look like ok? What else could be problematic with my code? Would it be good to change the private std::string members to std::string-pointers? Is it necessary or a good thing to do str = ""; in destructors?

On a side note: Please understand that I have done a lot of searching on "proper destructors" and similar keywords and it just didn't help. If you think this was asked too often: I don't, because I don't get it.

share|improve this question
5  
Ah ha ha ha - I think your idea of elegance is slightly flawed! As for efficiency... did you do the performance tests to prove this increase?? – Nick May 11 '12 at 14:21
3  
"I used std::vectors and all went fine". Yes, that's generally the case with std::vector. What does that tell you? – Robᵩ May 11 '12 at 14:22
1  
I very much doubt that you have gained a 300% increase in performance just by using new/delete rather than stl containers and smart pointers. – Nick May 11 '12 at 14:25
1  
@stefan - You have provided a very incomplete sketch of your program. If you want to receive answers that are better than guesses, please provide a short, commplete program that demonstrates the problem. See sscce.org. – Robᵩ May 11 '12 at 14:28
2  
It is missing main, #includes, and any mention of the new operator. It is missing adding any elements to your vector. Even after adding main, this program won't produce the error you complain about. – Robᵩ May 11 '12 at 14:36
up vote 1 down vote accepted

What Rob said, and also your destructors can be simplified to:

B::~B()
{
    delete a;
}

C::~C()
{
    for (size_t i = 0; i < bs.size(); ++i)
        delete bs[i];
}
share|improve this answer
    
why isn't it necessary to check for != NULL? i thought deleting the NULL-pointer were illegal. – stefan May 11 '12 at 14:28
1  
It's perfectly legal to delete null pointers. – Andreas Brinck May 11 '12 at 14:29
1  
@Robᵩ You beat me to it :) – Andreas Brinck May 11 '12 at 14:32
1  
@James Do you mean mine or the OP's? What's undefined about it? – Andreas Brinck May 11 '12 at 14:38
1  
@AndreasBrinck Yours (and the OP's). The standard says that all values in an std::vector must be copyable, and a pointer to deleted memory isn't copyable. Of course, 1) no implementation is actually going to copy the pointer unless you try to do something with it (or increase the size of the vector), and 2) implementations where copying a pointer to a deleted object will not work are inexistant, at least today. (The restriction dates from the early days of C, where certain implementations on Intel 80286 could fault when copying a deleted pointer.) – James Kanze May 11 '12 at 14:45

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