Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Possible Duplicate:
C/C++ changing the value of a const

The following program:

int main()
{
    const int x = 10;
    int * p = (int *)&x;
    *p = 12;
    cout<<x<<endl;
    cout<<*p<<endl;
    return 0;
}

Gives an output of:

10
12

What is the effect of casting &x to (int *) and why is the value of x still 10 ? I expected it to be 12.

Another doubt

Why cant we cast say int ** to int const ** ? Rather this operation is valid

void f(int const ** p);
void g(int const * const * p);

int main()
{
    int ** p = /*....*/
    f(p);   //Error
    g(p);   //OK
}

Please help me understanding this with suitable example Thanks !!!

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Lirik, Blue Moon, ybungalobill, Jonathan Leffler, the Tin Man May 12 '12 at 6:44

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
The 10 may be due to optimization; the compiler knows that x is const so it invokes cout << 10 << endl; instead of cout << x << endl;. What's less clear is whether the compiler optimizes the second output to cout << 12 << endl;. –  Jonathan Leffler May 11 '12 at 15:01
    
@JonathanLeffler....but what about the pointer p ? It was pointing to the address of x ...I dont know what exactly is happening after casting ((int*)&x step)...the pointer should modify the value of x normally...please explain whats going on in the memory address of 'x' here –  Kundan Kumar May 11 '12 at 15:04
    
What happens after the int *p = (int *)&x; step is undefined behaviour. Anything can happen; what happens is OK. Don't do it. –  Jonathan Leffler May 11 '12 at 15:07
    
I've removed the "C" tag since C++ and C are not the same language, particularly in the context of this question. –  tinman May 11 '12 at 15:08
    
@JonathanLeffler...please see the second part of my question –  Kundan Kumar May 11 '12 at 15:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You are invoking undefined behaviour by modifying a variable declared as const. Any result whatsoever is legitimate output from the program, though some results are more plausible than others.

As I noted in a comment:

The 10 may be due to optimization; the compiler knows that x is const so it may invoke:

cout << 10 << endl;

instead of:

cout << x << endl;

What's less clear is whether the compiler optimizes the second output to:

cout << 12 << endl;

You'd have to look at the assembler generated to know for sure. But since the whole program is invoking undefined behaviour, the compiler is correct, regardless of what it does.

share|improve this answer

The compiler will substitute a literal value when it is assigned to a const int. Effectively your program looks like:

        cout<<10<<endl;
        cout<<*p<<endl;
share|improve this answer
    
The compiler will do nothing of the sort. It might. It's undefined behavior. –  Crazy Eddie May 11 '12 at 15:08
    
@CrazyEddie, the part of the program that casts away constness will definitely produce undefined behavior, but I wasn't addressing that part since it appears to be doing something sensible. A const int is a compile-time constant as defined by the standard. –  Mark Ransom May 11 '12 at 15:16
    
Again that's wrong. There's nothing wrong with casting away constness; UB comes when you write to the result. Also const int is not a compile-time constant, it can be used in constructs requiring one (which the OP is not doing) and only when various other requirements are met. HUGE difference. –  Crazy Eddie May 11 '12 at 15:41

As of the main question, it has already been answered: modifying a constant object is undefined behavior.

For the second question, consider that if it was allowed you could break const-correctness inadvertidly:

const int k = 10;
void f(int const ** p) {
    *p = &k;                   // Valid, p promises not to change k
}
void g(int const * const * p);

int main()
{
    int *p;
    int ** pp = &p;
    f(pp);                     // If allowed: p points to k!!!
    p = 5;                     // Modifying a constant object!!!
    g(pp);                     //OK
}

In the case of g, because the signature of the function promises that the intermediate pointer will not be changed, the compiler knows that g will not modify *pp, which means that it cannot make *pp (i.e. p) point to a constant object, and const-correctness is guaranteed.

share|improve this answer

well, it is interesting question. when you remove the const prefix of x you will get the result as you wish.

int main()       
{               
 int x = 10;               
 int * p = (int *)&x;               
 *p = 12;              
 cout<<x<<endl;              
 cout<<*p<<endl;               
 return 0;      
}

I think it is the const mark prevent the change of the value of x.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.