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Let's say I have a delegate...

public delegate void MyAction(params object[] args);

And a class with a subclass that uses that delagate...

public class MyClass {
    public List<MySubClass> mySubClasses;
}

public class MySubClass {
    public string myString;
    public MyAction myDelegateMethod;
}

I want to be able to pass any method to myDelegateMethod, which could accept any number of arguments with varying types, at runtime. Something like this...

MyClass myClass = new MyClass(){
    mySubClasses = {
        new MySubClass {
            myString = "help",
            myDelegateMethod = Method1 
        },
        new MySubClass {
            myString = "me",
            myDelegateMethod = Method2 
        }
    }   
};

public string Method1(object myObject) { ... }
public string Method2(string value, Guid id) { ... }

How would I call each of these methods at runtime passing the appropriate arguments in?

myClass.mySubClasses.ForEach(x => {
    x.myDelegateMethod; // <-- this is where I'm stumped. how do i pass arguments here?
});

Is this possible? Perhaps I have something implemented wrong?

share|improve this question
    
And what are the arguments that you would pass in? –  Kirk Woll May 11 '12 at 15:34
    
@KirkWoll Method1(myObject) and Method2("abc", myGuid) –  bflemi3 May 11 '12 at 17:45
    
Correct me if I'm wrong, but that seems like test data. I assumed you would actually want to pass in real arguments, arguments that were derived elsewhere. If so, I'm curious how you would manage that given an arbitray number of potential parameters. (leaving aside the whole difficulty of calling it) –  Kirk Woll May 11 '12 at 17:50
    
@KirkWoll Your correct and that's where I'm stuck –  bflemi3 May 11 '12 at 17:54
    
But I'm not understanding -- even conceptually -- how you would know what arguments to pass the delegate at the callsite? Where you have, x.myDelegateMethod -- what would the argument be? Where would you get them? Are they available from x? It's not clear at all what arguments you would want to pass in. –  Kirk Woll May 11 '12 at 17:56
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This isn't possible, because Method1 and Method2 are NOT void <Name> (params object) delegates. They aren't the same type (or even convertible with variance to a compatible type), considering they return different values and take different parameters to execute.

If you wanted to execute an arbitrary method, then the only way I can think of would be to take a wrapped method execution as an action:

var sample = new List<MyClass>
{
    new MyClass
    {
        SomeProperty = "Help",
        Method = new Action(() =>
          {
              ExecuteMethod1("Hello", "World");
          })
    },
    new MyClass
    {
        SomeProperty = "Me",
        Method = new Action(() =>
          {
              ExecuteMethod2(1, 2, 3, 4);
          })
    },
};

And then you could execute like so:

myClass.ForEach(x => x.Method());

In this situation you need to explicitly wrap whatever you want to do (with parameters known at create time) the method you want to stick in Method.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you not familiar with Delegate.DynamicInvoke? –  Kirk Woll May 11 '12 at 15:35
    
Sure you could do that, but my impression is that the OP wanted a strongly typed delegate handler. –  Tejs May 11 '12 at 15:40
    
but what would you do if you didn't know what the values of the arguments were going to be until you actually called myClass.ForEach(x => x.Method()); –  bflemi3 May 11 '12 at 17:24
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First of all Method2 can't be used as your delegate. Also it's not a good practice to do so. You can try to do it with reflection, but it will be hardly understandable for others, who will read your code. So, I think, you should use all methods like you delegate type but cast to need types inside methods, like this:

public void Method1(params object[] pars)
{
    string value = (string)pars[0];
    Guid id = (Guid)pars[1];
}

or use some sort of closures from previous answer.

share|improve this answer
    
This and the above answer are the crux of the problem. Your delegates do not have the form of void(params object[] pars) so they do not match the delegate definition. Using the trick in this answer is how you would have each method utilize different parameter arguments. However, be sure to check for valid arguments or you will run into worse problems. –  SPFiredrake May 11 '12 at 17:40
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