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I have a simple PHP mailer script that takes values from a form submitted via POST and mails them to me:

<?php
$to = "me@example.com";

$name = $_POST['name'];
$message = $_POST['message'];
$email = $_POST['email'];

$body  =  "Person $name submitted a message: $message";
$subject = "A message has been submitted";

$headers = 'From: ' . $email;

mail($to, $subject, $body, $headers);

header("Location: http://example.com/thanks");
?>

How can I sanitize the input?

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1  
If you're using a straight-up text field, there shouldn't be any htmlentities in your $_POST data. If you're using some sort of rich text editor that generates html, use html_entity_decode(). Be sure to strip control characters from the subject -- newline chars in the subject can screw up your email headers –  Frank Farmer Jun 28 '09 at 18:46
3  
@Frank Farmer: are you suggesting he should trust that no offensive code would reach his code just because he used a "straight-up textfield"? That's terrible advice. –  Carlos Lima Jun 29 '09 at 10:11
1  
Heh, straight-up text field. Just did an XSS test on someone who did that. They didn't like the amusing picture sent via an img link entered in the "straight-up text field". –  Fiasco Labs Jan 30 '12 at 4:14
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5 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

sanitize the the post

with

filter_var

example here :

http://net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/php/sanitize-and-validate-data-with-php-filters/

like :

echo filter_var($_POST['email'], FILTER_SANITIZE_EMAIL);
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I like filter_var for this, sadly, not all hosting setups have 5.2 yet, but it appears to be a well-thought-out function. –  artlung Jun 28 '09 at 18:55
    
php 5 is quite good filter_var (PHP 5 >= 5.2.0) –  Haim Evgi Jun 28 '09 at 19:01
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Since you're not building an SQL query or anything here, the only relevant validation that I can see for those inputs is an email validation for $_POST["email"], and maybe an alphanumeric filter on the other fields if you really want to limit the scope of what the message can contain.

To filter the email address, simply use filter_var:

$email = filter_var($email, FILTER_SANITIZE_EMAIL);

As per Frank Farmer's suggestion, you can also filter out newlines in the email subject:

$subject = str_replace(array("\r","\n"),array(" "," "),$subject);
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Newline characters in email subject lines are somewhat problematic. –  Frank Farmer Jun 28 '09 at 18:49
    
Hi Frank, I've edited my answer to reflect your suggestion. –  Wadih M. Jun 28 '09 at 18:58
2  
Depending on exaclty how the email is constructed,newline characters can be injected into any email-header allowing the attacker to add any new or replacement email headers he likes. In addition to this, injecting a whole blank line (two newlines) then allows the attacker to insert an email body of his choice, completely overriding the generated email. –  Cheekysoft Jun 29 '09 at 10:03
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As others have noted, filter_var is great. If it's not available, add this to your toolchest.

The $headers variable is particularly bad security-wise. It can be appended to and cause spoofed headers to be added. This post called Email Injection discusses it pretty well.

filter_var is great, but another way to assure that something is an email address and not something bad is to use an isMail() function. Here's one:

function isEmail($email) {
    return preg_match('|^[_a-z0-9-]+(\.[_a-z0-9-]+)*@[a-z0-9-]+(\.[a-z0-9-]{2,})+$|i', $email);
};

So to use this, you could do:

if (isset($_POST['email']) && isEmail($_POST['email'])) {
    $email = $_POST['email'] ;
} else {
    // you could halt execution here, set $email to a default email address
    // display an error, redirect, or some combination here,
}

In terms of manual validation, limiting the length using substr(), running strip_tags() and otherwise limiting what can be put in.

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You need to remove any newlines from input provided by users in $headers, which gets passed to mail() ($email in your case)! See Email injection.

PHP should take care of sanitizing $to and $subject, but there are versions of PHP with bugs (Affected are PHP 4 <= 4.4.6 and PHP 5 <= 5.2.1, see MOPB-34-2007).

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Not sure if that's something you should be worried about, just throwing ideas.

Would it be an issue if the email message contained <script> tags? Maybe <img> or any other tag accessing an external server?

I know most mail clients nowadays don't allow those to run, but anyway, just making sure you're taking it in consideration.

If you don't expect anything fancy on the message stripping tags is an easy way out.

share|improve this answer
3  
Depending on exaclty how the email is constructed,newline characters can be injected into any email-header allowing the attacker to add any new or replacement email headers he likes. In addition to this, injecting a whole blank line (two newlines) then allows the attacker to insert an email body of his choice, completely overriding the generated email. –  Cheekysoft Jun 29 '09 at 10:03
    
@Cheekysoft: well pointed. –  Carlos Lima Jun 29 '09 at 10:14
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