Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having some problems with a generic abstract class and it's subclasses, and I don't know how to work it out. I have the following abstract class:

public abstract class Loader<T> where T: CommonPoco {
    public virtual List<T> LoadFromFile(StreamReader input, out List<T> result, bool trackProgress) {
        return LoadFromFile(input, out result, trackProgress, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture);
    }
    public abstract List<T> LoadFromFile(StreamReader input, out List<T> result, bool trackProgress, IFormatProvider format);
    public abstract T UploadToDb(List<T> data);
}

This is my CommonPoco:

public class CommonPoco {
    private int line;
    public int Line {
        get { return line; }
        set { line = value; }
    }

    private string error;
    public string Error {
        get { return error; }
        set { error = value; }
    }
}

Now I also have many other subclasses of Loader like this one:

public class CountryLoader: Loader<Country> {
    public override List<Country> LoadFromFile(StreamReader input,
        out List<Country> result, bool trackProgress, IFormatProvider format) {
        //Method implementation
    }
    public override Country UploadToDb(List<Country> data) {
        //Method implementation
    }

And I also have many subclasses of CommonPoco including the Country class. So far so good. Now to the problem, I would like to implement a, generic?, method. This method will, based on some parameter, use the correct loader for the task. Maybe something like this:

void LoadModule<T>(Module module) where T: CommonPoco {
    Loader<T> loader;
    switch (module) {
        case Module.Country:
            loader = new CountryLoader();
            break;
    }
}

This does not work and the compiler complains saying it can't convert from CountryLoader to Loader. I have to create a method to load each of my modules and they are exactly the same code except for the initialization of the Loader class. I really hate duplicated code so, how can I achieve this?

Forgot to mention, using .NET Framework 4.0. I'm willing to change whatever is needed, even my abstract class if I have to. Thanks. I wonder if using an interface instead of an abstract class would allow me to do this.

share|improve this question
    
You could use an IoC container such as Castle Windsor, or just reflection. But why do you have an out List<T> parameter in a method with a List<T> return value? That seems very odd. –  phoog May 11 '12 at 16:22
2  
Loader<Country> (which is CountryLoader) is not a Loader<CommonPoco>. So while Country may inherit from CommonPoco (even though that relationship isnt mentioned in the above OP), the generic class isnt an inheritance. –  Tejs May 11 '12 at 16:23
    
Also, this typically happens when people pass non type specific data (in this case, module) and expect strongly typed results. You might need to rethink how you plan on accessing that data if you can't determine the result type. –  Tejs May 11 '12 at 16:24
    
constraining Loader to CommonPoco is not generic. Why not just remove the generic definition and use CommonPoco directly in place of T. –  Jodrell May 11 '12 at 16:29
    
@phoog the return value is a list of objects that could not be loaded, so those are the errors. The out param is the actual loaded data. –  user1387786 May 11 '12 at 16:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

What if you turn your abstract class into an Interface, like this:

public interface ILoader<T> where T : CommonPoco
    {
        List<T> LoadFromFile(StreamReader input, out List<T> result, bool trackProgress);
        List<T> LoadFromFile(StreamReader input, out List<T> result, bool trackProgress, IFormatProvider format);
        T UploadToDb(List<T> data);
    }

Then change your CountryLoader implementation:

public class CountryLoader : ILoader<Country>
    {
        public List<Country> LoadFromFile(StreamReader input, out List<Country> result, bool trackProgress)
        {
            return LoadFromFile(input, out result, trackProgress, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture);
        }

        public List<Country> LoadFromFile(StreamReader input,
            out List<Country> result, bool trackProgress, IFormatProvider format)
        {
            //Method implementation
            result = null;
            return null;
        }

        public Country UploadToDb(List<Country> data)
        {
            //Method implementation
            return null;
        }
    }

And you create a method like this:

void LoadModule<T>(Module module) where T:CommonPoco
        {
            ILoader<T> loader;
            switch (module)
            {
                case Module.Country:
                    loader = new CountryLoader() as ILoader<T>;
                    break;
            }
        }

The problem with this is that you would have to implement your common LoadFromFile multiple times, unless someone else comes with a way to get around it.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks, this works. Just to clarify, there is no need to turn it into a interface, an abstract class works just fine. The key line is 'loader = new CountryLoader() as Loader<T>;'. –  user1387786 May 22 '12 at 16:28

You're running into an issue with covariant and contravariant types. Depending on which version of C# you're using, you may be able to mark your generic type with the 'in' (covariant) or 'out' (contravariant) markers. E.g., Loader, but in this case, your class is functioning in both a covariant (get safe) and contravariant (set safe) way. You can break up your class definitions to support both use cases, or you can use a more elaborate scheme for type resolution. If you're using an IoC container that supports open-generic resolution of inherited types (Castle Windsor does, StructureMap doesn't) then you can rely on the container to figure out which Loader you want to use in a given case.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry I forgot to mention it, using .net framework 4.0 for this project. And sorry again I have no idea what Castle Windsor or StructureMap are, will google those an check them out. –  user1387786 May 11 '12 at 16:44
1  
Co/contravariance (in/out) can only be used on interfaces, not classes. –  MgSam May 11 '12 at 18:11
    
Castle Windsor and StructureMap are Inversion of Control containers. They encapsulate object creation responsibilities (think Factory, Builder and Service Locator patterns). They can inspect a type definition to determine a) how to build it, including dependencies, and b) how to satisfy a request for a given type based on whatever rules are configured. –  pfries May 11 '12 at 18:55
    
Sorry, MgSam, should have made that clear. The above code could be rewritten to use interfaces. –  pfries May 11 '12 at 18:56

Here's the reason it complains: what if you tried to do it with some other POCO that's not Country but pass in country? Example: LoadModule<Continent>(Module.Country)? Now what's supposed to happen? It is this ambiguity that will get you into trouble.

The whole point of generic types is that it will work for ANY type that you pass in, but you're trying to set a specific type on a generic variable, regardless of the generic definition, which is bad practice (even when constrained). Keep generics generic. That said, just remove the generic definition and you should be fine.

void LoadModule(Module module) {
    Loader<CommonPoco> loader;
    switch (module) {
        case Module.Country:
            loader = (Loader<CommonPoco>)new CountryLoader();
            break;
    }
}

This is the premise behind polymorphism, in that you're using interfaces/base classes as the "definition" of what subclasses can/should do. That way, you specify the variable as the parent/base types (in this case, Loader and CommonPoco), and specific implementations (ie: CountryLoader) are just treated as the parent/base type for purposes of functionality (methods and properties).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply, tried this, but it does not work. Still get the same issue. –  user1387786 May 11 '12 at 16:48
    
It doesn't work because the code SPFiredrake gave is trying to use the type contravariantly. Co/Contravariance only works on interfaces. –  MgSam May 11 '12 at 18:10
    
Edited, but I realize this still won't work. Long story short, although a Country object is covariant with a CommonPoco object, a Loader<Country> object is not covariant with Loader<CommonPoco>. In my example, I tried it with an interface, and it still didn't like it (since Loader is an abstract class instead of an interface). blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/11/30/… –  SPFiredrake May 11 '12 at 18:10
    
And yes, changing the Loader and CommonPoco objects to be interfaces would allow this. –  SPFiredrake May 11 '12 at 18:15
    
@SPFiredrake you don't need to change CommonPoco to an interface, only Loader<T>. –  phoog May 11 '12 at 23:52

You could try abstracting out the methods in Loader<> into an interface marked as contravariant.

public interface ILoader<out T>

Then having the Loader base class implement this, and then using a method similar to what SPFiredrake described, except with ILoader<CommonPoco>.

share|improve this answer

but then you could accidentally call something like this

villageLoader = LoadModule<Village>(**countryModuleType**) ;

and it would be compiler fault that when you expected one loader you get another. see @killinaswine answer why ms developers think it is not a good idea to let you do this.

You can work around this problem on your own risk with type casting.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.