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I need to find all the words which contain a specific sequence of characters and delete them.

For example: I want to delete all the words which contain 'all'. This will delete 'hallway', 'wallet', ...

I believe that the SQL equivalent would be: LIKE '%all%'. What is its RegEx equivalent please?

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Do you want to delete "allow" and "hallway", too? Have you looked at regular-expressions.info ? –  Johnsyweb May 11 '12 at 17:08
    
No, all is in the middle but the previous characters in the word can be special characters –  user1288160 May 11 '12 at 17:11
    
You said "all the words which contain 'all', but your examples end with 'all'. This is not the same. What do you mean by "special characters"? –  Johnsyweb May 11 '12 at 17:15
1  
@user1288160, please edit the question to reflect the addition rule you mention above (and any others you might be overlooking). –  trebormf May 11 '12 at 17:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is pretty trivial and I do suggest you check out some of the regular expression cheatsheets you can find on the web.

.*all.*
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This will affect all lines containing 'all'. –  Johnsyweb May 11 '12 at 17:15
    
Agreed. That would be closest to a SQL LIKE. –  Tremmors May 11 '12 at 17:44

If you want words with "all" anywhere within them, you would use:

\w*all\w*

If you want words with "all" only at the middle or end, you would use:

\w+all\w*

If you want words with "all" only at the end, you would use:

\w+all(?=\W)
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"Find what": \w*all\w*
"Replace with": <nothing>
"Search mode": Regular expression
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This will affect all lines containing 'all'. –  Johnsyweb May 11 '12 at 17:15
    
@Johnsyweb You're right, such a simple one will not do in this case. But the TS has accepted the same answer, so maybe it does what he needs... –  Andrew Logvinov May 11 '12 at 17:25
    
Or more likely, the OP didn't know the answer to begin with and just accepted, without knowing whether it was correct. –  Andrew Barber May 11 '12 at 17:26
    
@AndrewBarber Yes, this is more likely. –  Andrew Logvinov May 11 '12 at 17:32

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