Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Ok, guys, for instance I have this form I told you before Only one DockContent in DockPanel

One edit I made since that times is words in each project appering when user clicks on some project in left pane. I easily created one triad for left pane.

It has projects presenter, projects view, projects model. Here is interfaces for each stuff:

interface IProjectsModel
{
    void AttachPresenter(IProjectsModelObserver observer);
    System.Collections.Generic.List<Project> projects { get; }
    Project selectedProject { get; set; }
}

public interface IProjectsViewObserver
{
    void UserChangedSelectedProject(Project project);
}
public interface IProjectsModelObserver
{
    void SelectedProjectChanged(Project project);
}

public interface IProjectsView : IView
{
    List<Project> projects { set; }
    Project project { set; }

    void AttachPresenter(IProjectsViewObserver presenter);
}

So at the moment I'm thinking about making a brand new another MVP triad for right pane. But this is not the main issue. The main issue I ran is how can I make communication process between MVP triads I told you above?

I have been read some article on the web telling that in this situation it's necessary to introduce some Model Coordinator to the project?

So guys my questions is:

  1. Am I right doing two triads intead of just one?
  2. How can I coordinate two triads between each other?
  3. Any proposes/suggestions/offers/advices/tips any many many many other stuff you think as useful for me will be very appreciated!

Big thanks in advance, guys! Thanks for your attention and time!

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

To coordinate between presenters you can have your MainForm class implement IProjectsViewObserver and set the text on the right dock pane when the user selects a different project. For instance:

class MainForm : IProjectsViewObserver
{
    void UserChangedSelectedProject(Project project)
    {
          rightDockPane.setText(project.getText());
    }
}

If you want to test this behavior, you can create a separate class:

class DockPaneProjectUpdater : IProjectsViewObserver

although this is unnecessary in this case because the code is so simple.

You can investigate simpler ways to do this using anonymous methods, but I do not know enough C# to help you there.

Am I right doing two triads instead of just one?

Yes, because the dock and pane are separate components they will likely need separate MVP triads. You can decide on the granularity (smallness) the MVP triads by trying to make code reusable and testable.

How can I coordinate two triads between each other?

Create a window-level presenter that wires the sub-presenters and can coordinate behavior between triads. You can have the window-presenter be a IProjectsViewObserver and act upon the DockContent. Or if you really want to modularize/unit test the behavior, you can make a separate presenter class (often an anonymous class) for inter-triad communication.

Any proposes/suggestions/offers/advices/tips any many many many other stuff you think as useful for me will be very appreciated!

Read Wikipedia and online articles about MVP and presenter-first. The biggest benefits of MVP are testability and behavior (presenter) modularity so make sure you are taking advantage of them by unit testing (often with a mock/DI framework) and refactoring out behavior into MVP triads when you can reuse code.

It will take some time to figure out how to apply the MVP pattern effectively, so be patient!

share|improve this answer
    
Could you please give me a some code sample on that? –  kseen May 12 '12 at 2:00
    
Why this window-presenter often is an anonymous class? –  kseen May 20 '12 at 8:38
    
The behavior isn't reusable since it is so specific to the interaction, but you still need to implement an interface. Therefore an anonymous class is a good fit. –  Garrett Hall May 20 '12 at 12:47
    
Could you please show me some code source to illustrate this option? I'm little struggled with it. –  kseen May 21 '12 at 2:58
    
Please see the updated answer and let me know if that helps. –  Garrett Hall May 21 '12 at 14:47
show 2 more comments

Follow Garrett's advice. Create subpresenters by a masterpresenter that are aware of each other and can act accordingly. The easiest way is to create a property in both panes' subpresenters.

Are you coming from the Java world? :) C# has its own implementation of observer pattern: events. Please have a look, so you don't need extra java-like interfaces anymore.

UPDATE: As I started writing I changed my mind. In my opinion, the best way to communicate between presenters is to use the shared model.

class SelectedProjectChangedEventArgs : EventArgs
{
    public Project SelectedProject {get;set;}
}

class Project
{

}

interface IReadOnlyModel
{
    Project SelectedProject {get;} 
    event EventHandler<SelectedProjectChangedEventArgs> SelectedProjectChanged;
}

interface IWritableModel
{
    Project SelectedProject {get;set;} 
    IList<Project> Projects {get;}
}

class Model : IReadOnlyModel, IWritableModel
{
    public Project SelectedProject {get;set;} 
    public event EventHandler<SelectedProjectChangedEventArgs> SelectedProjectChanged;
    public IList<Project> Projects {get;set;}
}

class ProjectsListPresenter
{
    readonly IWritableModel _model;

    public ProjectsListPresenter(IWritableModel model)
    {
        _model = model;
    }

    public void ChangeSelectedProject(Project project)
    {
        _model.SelectedProject = project;
    }
}

class ProjectDetailsPresenter
{
    readonly IReadOnlyModel _model;

    public ProjectDetailsPresenter(IReadOnlyModel model)
    {
        _model = model;
        _model.SelectedProjectChanged += ModelSelectedProjectChanged;
    }

    void ModelSelectedProjectChanged(object sender, SelectedProjectChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        //update right pane
    }
}


class WholeFormPresenter
{
    public ProjectDetailsPresenter DetailsPresenter {get;private set;}
    public ProjectsListPresenter ListPresenter {get;private set;}

    public WholeFormPresenter(Model model)
    {
        DetailsPresenter = new ProjectDetailsPresenter(model);
        ListPresenter = new ProjectsListPresenter(model);
    }
}

class WholeForm
{
    ListBox _projectsListControl;
    Panel _detailsPanel;
    public WholeForm()
    {
        var presenter = new WholeFormPresenter(new Model());
        _projectsListControl.Presenter = presenter.ListPresenter;
        _detailsPanel.Presenter = presenter.DetailsPresenter;
    }
}

I'm aware that the class/interface names are not perfect, but I hope the idea is clear.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you, please, point me at some code sample on that? It's really easier to understand if you see really practise code at the hand. To other paragpraph of your answer. No, I'm pure csharper. Never have any deal with Java. I'm just found events like something awkward mechanism. Please consider to see my other question about it here stackoverflow.com/questions/10561233/… –  kseen May 14 '12 at 3:19
    
Not only you use interfaces instead of events, but you use camelCasing instead of PascalCasing for public methods. Please have a look: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229043.aspx –  dzendras May 16 '12 at 5:53
1  
And I'll answer your question when I go back from work. –  dzendras May 16 '12 at 5:54
    
Are you still returning to home? :) –  kseen May 20 '12 at 8:21
    
Long way home ;) –  dzendras May 22 '12 at 5:22
show 3 more comments

If you want to achieve totally thin and abstract way of interaction between your triads, you can use Mediator pattern. Create "message" class/structure and one presenter will subscribe to it and another will send it.

This approach is very similar to subscription to events but gives more abstraction, since presenters on both sides could not even know whether recipient(s) of their message exists or not. Since you are working in context of one process you can pass anything you want in your messages even callback delegates. A good example of mediator pattern implementation could be found in MVVM Light framework. There it is called Messenger. Take a look at on of tests.

Personally, I used mediator when needed to send information between dialog windows that had no common parent or creator. In that scenario it helped to simplify things.

share|improve this answer
    
As you mentioned '...since presenters on both sides could not even know whether recipient(s) of their message exists or not...'. Is not events behaves the same way? –  kseen May 28 '12 at 3:39
    
This is almost the same, but before you invoke event you should check if it is not null, and this assumes that events are firing only when subscriber exists. –  Alexander Manekovskiy Jun 9 '12 at 22:40
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.