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Is it possible to apply one CSS declaration to more than one HTML element using nth-child?

For example I have a nested list and I want to apply the background colour red to list item 1, green to list items 2 to 4, blue to list items 5 to 8 and yellow to list item 9 using only 4 CSS declaration.

<ul id="nav">
  <li><a href="#">Home</a></li>
  <li><a href="#">About</a>
      <ul>
         <li><a href="#">Our Team</a></li>
         <li><a href="#">Our Goal</a></li>
      </ul>
  </li>
  <li><a href="#">Media</a>
      <ul>
         <li><a href="#">NLC in the News</a></li>
         <li><a href="#">Photos</a></li>
         <li><a href="#">Videos</a></li>
      </ul>
  </li>
  <li><a href="#">Events</a></li>
</ul>
share|improve this question
    
Huh... what are items 1, 2, 4, 5, 8 and 9? What are your 4 CSS declarations? Why such a contrived restriction as to only use :nth-child()? –  BoltClock May 11 '12 at 17:36
    
@BoltClock: I think 1-9 is just each li going downwards. –  thirtydot May 11 '12 at 17:37
    
@thirtydot: Ah, that makes sense. I just noticed there are only 9 of them in total. –  BoltClock May 11 '12 at 17:39
    
Well...It's actually a CSS drop down menu. The 4 main menus are Home, About, Media and Events and I want to give every category - main menu and its subs a different color when hovered. –  Infinity May 11 '12 at 17:43
    
That would create a not really maintainable stylesheet (What if you add a menu option?). When it comes to situations like this, good old classes seem to be more practical. –  kapa May 11 '12 at 17:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I see 4 outer li elements here (Home, About, Media, Events). If these correspond to the 4 CSS declarations (actually rules) you're referring to, then :nth-child() is only part of the solution:

#nav > li:nth-child(1) {
    background-color: red;
}

#nav > li:nth-child(2), #nav > li:nth-child(2) li {
    background-color: green;
}

#nav > li:nth-child(3), #nav > li:nth-child(3) li {
    background-color: blue;
}

#nav > li:nth-child(4) {
    background-color: yellow;
}

If you were looking for a formula to apply to the nth outer li and all its sub lis, then this would be it:

/* Of course, substitute n with the actual number */
#nav > li:nth-child(n), #nav > li:nth-child(n) li
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot BoltClock. That was very helpful, especially the formula. Here is the complete code and the result. –  Infinity May 11 '12 at 19:50
    
@Infinity: No problem. Remember that you can mark an answer accepted by clicking the checkmark. Welcome to the site! –  BoltClock May 11 '12 at 19:53

With Subgroups (like you have)

Well, in your case it is easier since they are subgrouped. This works.

#nav > li:nth-child(1) {background-color: red;}
#nav > li:nth-child(2), 
#nav > li:nth-child(2) > ul > li {background-color: green;}
#nav > li:nth-child(3), 
#nav > li:nth-child(3) > ul > li {background-color: blue;}
#nav > li:nth-child(4) {background-color: yellow;}

For a Single List (like others might have)

It would also be possible if it were all one list, but you need to allow the cascade to help. See this example:

HTML

<ul id="nav"> 
  <li><a href="#">Home</a></li> 
  <li><a href="#">About</a></li> 
  <li><a href="#">Our Team</a></li> 
  <li><a href="#">Our Goal</a></li> 
  <li><a href="#">Media</a></li> 
  <li><a href="#">NLC in the News</a></li> 
  <li><a href="#">Photos</a></li> 
  <li><a href="#">Videos</a></li>   
  <li><a href="#">Events</a></li> 
</ul>

CSS

#nav > li:nth-child(1) {background-color: red;} 
#nav > li:nth-child(n+2) {background-color: green;} 
#nav > li:nth-child(n+5) {background-color: blue;} 
#nav > li:nth-child(n+9) {background-color: yellow;}  
share|improve this answer
    
Re your edit: it's not exactly the best idea to restructure your markup to accommodate CSS's structural pseudo-classes :P –  BoltClock May 11 '12 at 17:52
    
@BoltClock--that was not my point for the edit. My point was to show that had his markup been a single list, the coloring could still have been done as he was desiring. PS: I was trying to get my CSS code to show correctly, how did you get it to not appear as comments? –  ScottS May 11 '12 at 17:57
    
@BoltClock--oh, it must be the <!-- language: lang-css --> you put in. –  ScottS May 11 '12 at 17:59
2  
That's right. I mention this in the edit summary: stackoverflow.com/editing-help#syntax-highlighting You'll have to add these in manually due to this meta issue. –  BoltClock May 11 '12 at 17:59

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