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I want to call the stored procedure using C#.

I would like to create a shorthand for the procedure call.

I still do not want to re-define the connection and open it. How do I create a method - I still did not open connection to the database?

I use the following code:

SqlConnection conn = null;
SqlDataReader rdr  = null;

conn = new SqlConnection("");
conn.Open();

SqlCommand cmd  = new SqlCommand("Procedure", conn);
cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader();

while (rdr.Read())
{
}
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2  
Ouch. I think you need to clarify or rethink your question. If you're asking us how to wrap this in a method, you need more help than we can give you. Also, you're missing a crap load of using and/or Dispose() calls. –  Thinking Sites May 11 '12 at 18:03
1  
I still do not want to re-define the connection and open it. Can you re-word this? I don't understand. –  McGarnagle May 11 '12 at 18:05
1  
First you read the MSDN documentation on SqlConnection which will answer half of your questions. –  ErnieL May 11 '12 at 18:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

FlyingStreudel's answer is good, but I've adapted that code to make this version that demonstrates best practices (links at the bottom.) You can also use Microsoft's Enterprise Library which will give you robust Data Access classes.

private string _connectionString = "yourconnectionstring"; // from web.config, or wherever you store it
public static SqlDataReader executeProcedure(string commandName, 
                                         Dictionary<string, object> params)
{
    SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(_connectionString);
    conn.Open();
    SqlCommand comm = conn.CreateCommand();
    comm.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
    comm.CommandText = commandName;
    if (params != null)
    {
        foreach(KeyValuePair<string, object> kvp in params)
            comm.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter(kvp.Key, kvp.Value));
    }
    return comm.ExecuteReader(System.Data.CommandBehavior.CloseConnection);
}

used, like so:

Dictionary<string, object> paras = new Dictionary<string, object>();
paras.Add("user_name", "Timmy");
paras.Add("date", DateTime.Now);
using(SqlDataReader results = executeProcedure("sp_add_user", paras))
{
    while (results.Read())
    {
        //do something with the rows returned
    }
}

References:

How Microsoft use Connections in Enterprise Library

Keeping an SqlConnection open is 'foo bar'

Returning a data reader from a class

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1  
You legitimately just copied and pasted my code and added two lines. It is not 'best practice' to create a connection for every procedure call. Your method of have a private connection string variable is also terrible, if you ever want to change the database you are working with you now have to recompile your code. –  FlyingStreudel May 12 '12 at 17:24
    
Thanks for the feedback. You can assign connection string however you like (from config is normal, so I added a comment to that effect). Yes, closing a connection properly only takes one or two lines, but it's important. –  mafue May 12 '12 at 19:51

I have no idea if I understand what you are asking or not, but do you mean something like:

public static SqlReader executeProcedure(SqlConnection oConn, string commandName, Dictionary<string, object> params)
{
    SqlCommand comm = oConn.CreateCommand();
    comm.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
    comm.CommandText = commandName;
    if (params != null)
        foreach(KeyValuePair<string, object> kvp in params)
            comm.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter(kvp.Key, kvp.Value));
    return comm.ExecuteReader();
}

An example of use might be

Dictionary<string, object> paras = new Dictionary<string, object>();
paras.Add("user_name", "Timmy");
paras.Add("date", DateTime.Now);
SqlReader results = executeProcedure(oConn, "sp_add_user", paras);
while (results.Read())
{
    //do something with the rows returned
}
results.Close();
share|improve this answer
    
How can I create a method to retrieve data? I need to read the data. –  JohnMalcom May 11 '12 at 18:09
    
You cant really create a method to retrieve data as column will vary with whatever stored proc you call. You can just increment the row in the SqlReader and process until complete. –  FlyingStreudel May 11 '12 at 18:14
    
How can I add parameters to sql command? –  JohnMalcom May 11 '12 at 18:16
    
I've updated my answer, but you should really check out the documentation for SqlCommand here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  FlyingStreudel May 11 '12 at 18:20
    
Thank you FlyingStreudel! Can you give an example: how can I define the parameters (in input)? –  JohnMalcom May 11 '12 at 18:24
using (SqlConnection sqlConnection1 = new SqlConnection("Your Connection String")) {
using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand()) {
  Int32 rowsAffected;

  cmd.CommandText = "StoredProcedureName";
  cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
  cmd.Connection = sqlConnection1;

  sqlConnection1.Open();

  rowsAffected = cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();

}}
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If you're looking to reuse this kind of code, one possible solution is to wrap this kind of a method (one that executes a stored procedure and returns results) into a generic data access layer of your application. The variations you'd have to consider are for procedures not returning results, or expecting parameters.

You could, for example, wrap this shell code as an ExecuteProcedure() that expects a connection string back to the database.

There are myriad other ways to accomplish this kind of task, so you need to determine what would be the best option suited to your particular requirements.

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You can wrap this code and take the procedure as a parameter. Something like this:

public SqlCommand GetData(string procedure)
{
  var conn = new SqlConnection(connectionString);
  var cmd = new SqlCommand(procedure, conn);

  cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
  conn.Open();
  return cmd;
}

The only problem with this method is that you are not properly disposing resources and are relying on the caller to do so.

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