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I'm trying to create a new page called edit_profile for my User model so that the user can edit his profile(string). I'm following http://railscasts.com/episodes/41-conditional-validations

Here is the form (edit_profile.html.erb):

  <%= form_for @user, :html => { :multipart => true } do |f| %>

  <div class="field">
    <%= f.label :profile %><br/>
    <%= f.text_area :profile, :class => "round" %><br />
  </div>

  <div class="actions">
    <%= submit_tag "update", :id => "updateSubmit" %>
  </div>
<% end %>

The problem I'm having is that I have validation for the presence of password and password confirmation. When I load my edit_profile view, I keep getting this message Password is too short (minimum is 6 characters) even before I try to submit a new profile.

Here is my users_controller.rb:

def edit_profile
  @user = current_user
  @user.updating_password = false
  @user.save
  @title = "Edit profile"
end

def update
  @user = User.find(params[:id])
  if @user.update_attributes(params[:user])
    flash[:success] = "Account updated."
    redirect_to @user
  else
    @title = "Edit user"
    render 'edit'
  end
end

How do I bypass my password validation when I just want to edit my profile attribute in the user model?

Thanks!

Other relevant information:

user.rb

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
    attr_accessor :password, :updating_password
    attr_accessible :name, :email, :password, :password_confirmation, :photo, 
                    :profile
    before_save :downcase_fields
    before_save :encrypt_password
    validates_presence_of :password, :if => :should_validate_password?
    validates_confirmation_of :password, :if => :should_validate_password?      
    def should_validate_password?
      updating_password || new_record?
    end

    validates :name, :presence => true,
              :name_format => true,  
              :uniqueness => { :case_sensitive => false }          
    validates :email, :presence => true, 
              :email_format => true,
              :uniqueness => { :case_sensitive => false }
    validates :password, 
               #:presence => true,
              #:confirmation => true,
              :length => { :within => 6..40 }
    validates :profile,  :length => { :maximum => 160 }
end
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What does your User class look like? –  juwiley May 11 '12 at 19:19
    
@juwiley Added user model to my post with relevant info. –  Huy May 11 '12 at 19:23
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Given you're talking about profile editing, i.e. you already have a registered user with password, you might want to conditionally skip password updating.

Just remove password and password_confirmation if password_confirmation is blank. I.e.:

class UsersController < ApplicationController
  before_filter :skip_password_attribute, only: :update

  ...

  def update
    ...
  end

  private

  def skip_password_attribute
    if params[:password].blank? && params[:password_validation].blank?
      params.except!(:password, :password_validation)
    end
  end
end
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2  
I still get the error Password can't be blank Password is too short (minimum is 6 characters) even if I add the hidden form fields. –  Huy May 11 '12 at 20:41
    
Having the same issue hyngyn is having. –  jwg2s Dec 10 '12 at 0:41
    
To remove the "Password can't be blank" and "Password is too short (minimum is 6 characters)", go to the user model (user.rb file) and add ":on => :create" for the two validate statements for password length and password presence (e.g. "validates :password_confirmation, :presence => true, :on => :create"). –  Alexandra Mar 24 '13 at 20:40
    
@Alexandra Won't that allow the user to change their password to a non-compliant value after registering? (Edit: I just tried this; yes, it does.) –  GalacticCowboy May 31 '13 at 18:50
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(1) Typically, when @user is a new record, the form_for will go to create, and when the @user is not a new record it will go to update. If this fails to happen, then, you need to set the :url, an maybe the :method.

<%= form_for @user, :url => (@user.new_record? ? users_path : user_path(@user),
            :html => (@user.new_record? ? { :multipart => true, :method => :post } : { :multipart => true, :method => :put } do |f| %>

(2) What you asked for is

class User
  validate :validate_password_length

  def validate_password_length
    !new_record? || password.length >= 8
  end
end

however, that lets a new user create an account the change the password to something shorter. So it would be better to do the following:

class User
  validate :validate_password_length

  def validate_password_length
    !password_changed? || password.length >= 8
  end
end
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I recommend devise for user auth & stuff. This is taken from the devise source (https://github.com/plataformatec/devise/blob/master/lib/devise/models/validatable.rb):

validates_presence_of     :password, :if => :password_required?
validates_confirmation_of :password, :if => :password_required?
validates_length_of       :password, :within => 6..128, :allow_blank => true

protected
  def password_required?
    !persisted? || !password.nil? || !password_confirmation.nil?
  end
share|improve this answer
    
Using this method, I still get the error Password can't be blank Password is too short (minimum is 6 characters) even if I add the hidden form fields. –  Huy May 11 '12 at 20:38
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You just need to add :on => :create to validate.

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1  
I recommend you provide some context on where this change needs to be made; perhaps a code snippet that cites where the change should go? –  Nathaniel Ford Oct 27 '12 at 0:18
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Here's how I ended up solving this problem, though I'm pretty sure it's not ideal - the validation method would need to be more complex if you have additional password-strength rules.

Basically, you don't actually have to change the controller at all - you can fix up your model to handle this scenario.

First, you can set the :on => :create attribute on your password and password_confirmation fields. However, this has the side effect that users must supply a compliant password at registration, but can then change it to a non-compliant one later. To resolve this, I added a before_update callback to validate the password field when doing an update. My User class now looks something like this:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  ...
  before_update :check_password
  ...
  validates :password, presence: true,
                       length: { minimum: 6 },
                       on: :create

  validates :password_confirmation, presence: true,
                                    on: :create
  ...
  private
    ...
    def check_password
      is_ok = self.password.nil? || self.password.empty? || self.password.length >= 6

      self.errors[:password] << "Password is too short (minimum is 6 characters)" unless is_ok

      is_ok # The callback returns a Boolean value indicating success; if it fails, the save is blocked
    end
end

As noted in the comment above, the result of this method determines whether the save will be attempted. In order to prevent the user being dumped back into the edit form without an error message, I inject one. [:password] tells it which field to attach the error to.

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