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I've got a website that I want to check to see if it was updated since the last check (using hash). The problem is that I need to enter a username and password before I can visit the site.

Is there a way to input the username and the password using python?

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You can also use twill. –  Claris May 11 '12 at 19:37
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3 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

For sure, check out the requests module http://docs.python-requests.org/en/latest/index.html

Real quick, if you do something like

    import requests

    payload= {'user' : 'username',
              'pass' : 'PaSSwoRd'}

    r = requests.get(r'http://www.URL.com/home',data=payload)

    print r.text

You should be alright. If you told us the site in question we could probably provide a better answer.

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A solution using the standard python library is preferable. –  garnertb May 11 '12 at 19:39
    
Note that if the server uses HTTP Basic Authentication, you'd use auth= instead of data= in the example. –  jrennie May 11 '12 at 19:42
    
I'm sorry but I didn't put the site in the question because it's a federal site –  Jah May 11 '12 at 19:44
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Yes, it's possible to send the same info as the browser does. Depending on how the browser communicates with the server, it could be as simple as adding username and password as HTTP POST parameters. Other common methods are for the browser to send a hash of the password, or to log in with more than one step.

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It's possible to send POST requests from Python. Take a look at httplib, it's standard library for http requests. There are other libraries that could help you act more like a browser. My favorite is mechanize.

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