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I am using forward declaration and now I am getting an error referring to the class that uses the forward declaration...so fInstance forward declares fConfig and then the Helper class (a namespace - used for global access to functions) - getting t

fConfig.h

#ifndef FCONFIG_H
#define FCONFIG_H

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>
#include <cstring>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include "JWDSFork.h"
//#include "fInstance.h"

using namespace std;

class fConfig
{
    private:
        pid_t pid, w;

    public:
        pid_t cPid;
        string name;

        int group;
        int instanceId;
        int numInstance;
        int tries;

        bool reply;
        bool debug;
        bool service;
        bool currentlyRunning;

        time_t startTime;
        time_t endTime;

        string path;

        fConfig();
        virtual ~fConfig();

        void start();
        string intToString(int);
        char* stringToChar(string);
};

#endif // FCONFIG_H

fInstance.h

#ifndef FINSTANCE_H
#define FINSTANCE_H

//#include "fConfig.h"
#include <vector>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class fConfig;


class fInstance
{
public:

    fConfig* config;
    pid_t pid;
    vector<string> notes;
    vector<time_t> times;

    fInstance();
    virtual ~fInstance();


};

#endif // FINSTANCE_H

Helper.h

#ifndef HELPER_H
#define HELPER_H

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cstring>
#include <vector>
#include <sstream>
#include <limits.h>
#include "fInstance.h"

using namespace std;

namespace Helper
{
    extern string APPDIR;

    bool errorCheck(int, char*);
    string charToString(char*, int);
    string longToString(unsigned long);
    bool Contains(vector<fInstance>, fInstance);
    string convertInt(int);
    string convertDouble(double);
    bool Read(int, char*, size_t);
    bool Write(int, char*, size_t);
};

#endif // HELPER_H

Helper.cpp

//Helper.cpp - function that causes a problem
#include "Helper.h"
namespace Helper
{

bool Contains(vector<fInstance> a, fInstance b)
    {
        for(unsigned int i= 0; i < a.size(); i++ )
        {
            if(a[i].config.name == b.config.name)
            {
                return true;
            }
        }

        return false;
    }
}

I am getting these errors

error: request for member ‘name’ in ‘a.std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::operator[] [with _Tp = fInstance, _Alloc = std::allocator<fInstance>](((long unsigned int)i))->fInstance::config’, which is of non-class type ‘fConfig*’
share|improve this question
1  
if(a[i].config->name == b.config->name)? In any case, you're just reinventing std::find_if here, which is bad. –  ildjarn May 11 '12 at 20:26
3  
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

That's a pretty unfriendly error message, but what it means is that the config member is a pointer, so you need to use the -> operator instead, ie.

 if(a[i].config->name == b.config->name)
share|improve this answer
    
when i do that...I end up having to change all the variables that request config->(some_variable) into pointers...so after doing all of that - it ends up giving error:forward declaration of 'struct fConfig' –  JonH May 11 '12 at 20:34
    
@JonH - In the alternative, you can change your fInstance to hold an`fConfig` instead of an fConfig*. Either way is up to you, but if it is a pointer, you must use ->; if it is an object you must use .. –  Robᵩ May 11 '12 at 21:02
    
Jon: Helper.cpp needs to #include "fConfig.h" if it's going to anything with the members of an fConfig structure. –  Peter May 11 '12 at 21:49
add comment

Assuming that you have an operator== overloaded for your type fInstance, you can write your function as (note also that you should pass your parameters a and b by reference-to-const)

#include<algorithm>

bool fInstance::operator==(const fInstance& other) 
{ 
    return config->name == other.config->name; 
}

bool Contains(const vector<fInstance>& a, const fInstance& b)
{
    return std::find_if(a.begin(), a.end(), b);
}

If you don't have an operator== in your fInstance class, you can use a C++11 lambda expression

bool Contains(const vector<fInstance>& a, const fInstance& b)
{
    return std::find_if(a.begin(), a.end(), 
    [](const fInstance& i) { return i.config->name == b.config->name; });
}

And even better yet, you should encapsulate the name member into a member function of fInstance:

std::string fInstance::name() { return config->name; };

bool Contains(const vector<fInstance>& a, const fInstance& b)
{
    return std::find_if(a.begin(), a.end(), 
    [](const fInstance& i) { return i.name() == b.name(); });
}

This increases encapsulation, decreases compilation times and makes the implementation of the fInstance class opaque to its clients. Your current implementation leaves the fConfig implementation transparant to clients. This decrease in encapsulation is called a violation of the Law of Demeter.

share|improve this answer
    
when i change everything to use pointers...I end up having to change all the variables that request config->(some_variable) into pointers...so after doing all of that - it ends up giving error:forward declaration of 'struct fConfig' –  JonH May 11 '12 at 20:40
    
@JonH see the C++ section of en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opaque_pointer for more info on your pointer to data type. In particular, you might want to forward declare fconfig inside the fInstance class. –  TemplateRex May 11 '12 at 20:44
1  
@JonH You might take a look at the 2nd most voted question: stackoverflow.com/questions/388242/… and get a copy of Effective C++. The pointer to implementation -or pimpl- idiom is covered about halfway along that book. –  TemplateRex May 11 '12 at 21:07
1  
@rhalbersma : I'd +2 this for that comment and the answer if I could. –  ildjarn May 12 '12 at 1:40
2  
While the operator == approach is succinct, I'd still prefer the lambda unless comparison of the class by config->name is the obvious way of comparing them. I've been bitten before by classes with overloaded operators that then allow use with STL algorithms and containers but don't necessarily do what you expect. –  Peter May 12 '12 at 16:53
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