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I'm processing a large chunk of data, and am trying to return all the lines within it that contain the string "INFO:". I've managed to get the pattern to return the data that I'm interested in, but wanted to know how to improve this regex pattern to omit the string that I'm matching (as well as the white space if possible), so that only the actual data I'm interested in is returned.

$pattern = "/^.*INFO:.*\$/m";
preg_match_all($pattern, $content, $matches);

INFO:   framerate             25.00
INFO:   width                 480.00
INFO:   height                360.00
INFO:   audioinputvolume      75.00
INFO:   audiocodecid          mp4a
INFO:   audiodatarate         48.00
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If this is a tab delimited file (which it appears to be) it would be far better to explode the string and get the fields than to use a regex –  Cfreak May 11 '12 at 20:32
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Put the groups you are interested in matching in a subpattern ( )

I think in your case it would look like:

$pattern = "/^.*INFO:(.*)\$/m";

Now you can see the contents of what was in the parentheses using $matches[1][$match]

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preg_match_all('/^INFO:\s+([^\s]+)\s+([^\s]+)$/ms', $content, $matches);

Returns:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [0] => INFO:   framerate             25.00
            [1] => INFO:   width                 480.00
            [2] => INFO:   height                360.00
            [3] => INFO:   audioinputvolume      75.00
            [4] => INFO:   audiocodecid          mp4a
            [5] => INFO:   audiodatarate         48.00
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [0] => framerate
            [1] => width
            [2] => height
            [3] => audioinputvolume
            [4] => audiocodecid
            [5] => audiodatarate
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [0] => 25.00
            [1] => 480.00
            [2] => 360.00
            [3] => 75.00
            [4] => mp4a
            [5] => 48.00
        )

)

Note that neither field is allowed to have spaces this way.

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+1, but why the U modifier? Making the plus lazy doesn't change the outcome. –  Tim Pietzcker May 11 '12 at 20:38
    
Actually, that was a remnant from a pattern I tried before, fixed - thanks! –  ccKep May 11 '12 at 20:41
    
Not sure what to make of this...I get 3 empty arrays, though the data you're using is a cut/paste of the data I'm usin.g –  GDP May 11 '12 at 20:44
    
Are you sure you're actually having newlines at the end of each line? –  ccKep May 11 '12 at 20:45
    
ah...that could be it...it's actually the result of a proc_open that I'm using, so don't *actually know what's being used there for new lines. My editor interprets whatever is being returned as linefeeds, thus I could cut/paste. –  GDP May 11 '12 at 20:48
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$pattern = "/INFO:\s+(.*?)\s+(.*?)(\s|$)/m";

That should do the trick. The stuff matched in parentheses will appear as elements in $matches[1] and $matches[2]

Here's what this would output:

Array
(
[0] => Array
    (
        [0] => INFO:   framerate             25.00

        [1] => INFO:   width                 480.00

        [2] => INFO:   height                360.00

        [3] => INFO:   audioinputvolume      75.00

        [4] => INFO:   audiocodecid          mp4a

        [5] => INFO:   audiodatarate         48.00
    )

[1] => Array
    (
        [0] => framerate
        [1] => width
        [2] => height
        [3] => audioinputvolume
        [4] => audiocodecid
        [5] => audiodatarate
    )

[2] => Array
    (
        [0] => 25.00
        [1] => 480.00
        [2] => 360.00
        [3] => 75.00
        [4] => mp4a
        [5] => 48.00
    )

[3] => Array
    (
        [0] => 

        [1] => 

        [2] => 

        [3] => 

        [4] => 

        [5] => 
    )

)

There is a third array of all the whitespace/end of line characters because I used parentheses in order to use the | operator to say that whitespace OR the end of the text is fine to match.

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Credit for the good answer, but drew010 beat you by a few moments –  GDP May 11 '12 at 20:38
1  
That doesn't capture the last 48.00 since there is no whitespace after it. –  ccKep May 11 '12 at 20:39
    
I agree, /^INFO:\s+(.*?)\s+(.*?)\s*$/m would be better, although both would fail if the first term can contain spaces. –  Tim Pietzcker May 11 '12 at 20:41
    
@ccKep thanks for the pointer. I totally missed that. –  Michael Taggart May 11 '12 at 20:46
    
@TimPietzcker thanks. Looking at it again it really doesn't need the ^ to indicate the beginning of the line so I omitted it. You know, just in case some pesky whitespace appears. ;) –  Michael Taggart May 11 '12 at 20:47
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