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I am making a converter that will take infix expressions and convert them into postfix expressions.

Example:
Infix: 2 * 3 - 10 / 4
Postfix: 2 3 * 10 4 / -

I have a the method completely coded but the postfix expression it returns is

2     3   *   1 0     4 / -

There are two problems with this: 1. The major problem is that their is a space between the 1 and 0, when they should be together (10). 2. There are a lot of extra spaces, the output should look like the example provided above.

I have done research on converting from infix to postfix, but I couldn't determine how to do more then single digit expression conversions.

Below is attached my postfixtoinfix class, the expression variable holds the infix indicated in the example above with perfect spacing.

import java.util.*;

public class InfixToPostfix
{
//Declare Instance Variables
private String expression;
private Stack<Character> stack = new Stack<Character>();

//Constructor
public InfixToPostfix(String infixExpression)
{
        expression = infixExpression;
}//End of constructor

//Translate's the expression to postfix
public String translate()
{
    //Declare Method Variables
    String input = "";
    String output = "";
    char character = ' ';
    char nextCharacter = ' ';

    for(int x = 0; x < expression.length(); x++)
    {
        character = expression.charAt(x);

        if(isOperator(character))
        {
            while(!stack.empty() && precedence(stack.peek())>= precedence(character))
                output += stack.pop() + " ";
            stack.push(character);
        }   
        else if(character == '(')
        {
            stack.push(character);
        }
        else if(character == ')')
        {
            while(!stack.peek().equals('('))
                output += stack.pop() + " ";
            stack.pop();
        }
        else
        {
            if(Character.isDigit(character) && (x + 1) < expression.length() && Character.isDigit(expression.charAt(x+1)))
            {
                output += character;
            }
            else if(Character.isDigit(character))
            {
                output += character + " ";
            }   
            else
            {
                output += character;
            }
        }
    }//End of for

    while(!stack.empty())
    {
        output += stack.pop() + " ";
    }

    return output;
}//End of translate method

//Check priority on characters
public static int precedence(char operator)
{
    if(operator == '+' || operator =='-')
        return 1;
    else if(operator == '*' || operator == '/')
        return 2;
    else
        return 0;
}//End of priority method

public boolean isOperator(char element)
{
    if(element == '*' || element == '-' || element == '/' || element == '+')
        return true;
    else
        return false;
}//End of isOperator method

}//End of class
share|improve this question
    
Please don't put "PLEASE HELP URGENT" in your question title. Thanks. –  Oliver Charlesworth May 11 '12 at 20:43
2  
Does anybody EVER talk about postfix without it being related to homework? –  jahroy May 11 '12 at 20:59
    
No, because if it wasn't homework I wouldn't be posting on here about it because I would have much more time to independently determine what's wrong. –  Gandhi May 11 '12 at 21:03
2  
Ha ha, you're under the mistaken impression that there are no due dates once you leave school. –  digitaljoel May 11 '12 at 21:11
    
On the bright side, it's a fun problem :-) –  Tony Ennis May 11 '12 at 21:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your code is not seeing "10" as a single entity, but rather as two separate characters, '1', and '0'. For anything that isn't an operator or parens you do output += character + " "; which is going to give you your 1 0 instead of the desired 10.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah i know what the problem is. I just dont know a solution to it. –  Gandhi May 11 '12 at 20:52
    
I guess the simple answer would be to look at where you are adding spaces. For starters, the statement I pointed out is in the general else, which means if character is a space, then you are adding two spaces to output. –  digitaljoel May 11 '12 at 21:02
    
the general else is also applied to the any integer in the string, so the space addition is needed to separate it from the operators. Can I use something like if(character.isDigit()) add space and character else just add the character to output? –  Gandhi May 11 '12 at 21:09
    
You might be able to use that, give it a go and see what happens. –  digitaljoel May 11 '12 at 21:17
    
in the else statement i tried if(Character.isDigit(character) && Character.isDigit(expression.charAt(x+1))) { output += character; } else if(Character.isDigit(character)) { output += character + " "; } else { output += character; } but i get StringIndexOutOfBoundsException, how would i work around that? –  Gandhi May 11 '12 at 21:22

The problem of converting an arbitrary arithmetic expression from its infix from (i.e. conventional for arithmetic expression) to a postfix form is not as simple as it might appear at first.

Arithmetic expressions represent a context free language, which can be recognised using a pushdown automation. As the result of such recognition a syntax tree or an AST (abstract syntax tree) could be constructed, which would be walked bottom-up in order to construct an postfix form.

A good practical book on this without too much of the theory is Language Implementation Patterns, which I highly recommend.

share|improve this answer
    
I will surely read about that later. currently, can you assist me in fixing my code in anyway? –  Gandhi May 11 '12 at 21:00
    
Well... its not really about fixing it, it's more about getting it right from scratch. –  01es May 11 '12 at 21:03
    
Does that mean there is no way to fix my current code. I thought I was close to being done. I implemented the algorithm discussed in my class, so im sure its not completely incorrect. –  Gandhi May 11 '12 at 21:05
    
The provided code won't be able to recognise a complete arithmetic expression language. Unless there are specific restrictions on how arithmetic expression can be constructed in your case (e.g. no nested parentheses) then a different solution should be developed (lexer for recognising lexems such as numbers, operations etc., and a parser to recognise a stream of lexems as a valid arithmetic expression) –  01es May 11 '12 at 21:11
    
My program only has to calculate + - * / and ( ). –  Gandhi May 11 '12 at 21:21

Like @digitaljoel said, you are recognizing individual characters as lexical tokens, instead of complete words as tokens.

Instead of reading a single character and then deciding what token (operator or operand) it is, you should be having the parser call a method to read the next complete token from the input. The token can then be returned as a string (containing one or more characters comprising the token), or as a class object (containing the text of the token, and some kind of token_type property).

Otherwise, your parser is limited to handling only single-character tokens.

Another benefit of using a separate lexical analyzer to read tokens is that you can handle whitespace in the lexer instead of in the parser.

share|improve this answer
    
@01es I understand that your solution is much more appropriate, but I am limited to using my current approach by lack of time and knowledge. Thank you for the information. edit: question has been updated and double digits work now. I think my solution is quite inefficient, do you see anything i could change to make it better? –  Gandhi May 11 '12 at 21:50

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