Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a problem. Right now, a file that was supposed to be tab-delimited is missing a few "newlines"... My file looks something like this right now

Field1 Field2 Field3
Field1 Field2 Field3 Field1 Field2 Field3 Field1 Field2 Field3
Field1 Field2 Field3 Field1 Field2 Field3
Field1 Field2 Field3
Field1 Field2 Field3 Field1 Field2 Field3
Field1 Field2 Field3

I want to make it look uniform, with each "field1" starting at a new line

Field1 Field2 Field3
Field1 Field2 Field3
Field1 Field2 Field3
Field1 Field2 Field3
Field1 Field2 Field3

The problem is, each of these columns has a unique set of data, so I can't find a familiar place to split it into a new line. Any help is greatly appreciated!

PS: doing this in sed or tr would be greatly appreciated PS: there can be up to 150 columns, not just 6 or 9 or any other multiple of 3

share|improve this question
3  
If you can't find a place to split it, what makes you think an unintelligent splitting utility can? –  geekosaur May 11 '12 at 20:51
    
Well, I was hoping there was a way to split into a new line after every third tab –  Raymosrunerx May 11 '12 at 20:53
    
But line 5 there has no separator between Field3 and Field1. –  geekosaur May 11 '12 at 20:55
    
Wouldn't just a few rules help? If more than 3 columns, check if 6 or 9 columns and add new lines accordingly. If number_of_columns % 3 is not 0 you would need a manual check? –  sunn0 May 11 '12 at 20:56
1  
time to push back on your data provider. Good luck. –  shellter May 11 '12 at 21:02
show 1 more comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This might work for you:

sed 's/\s/\n/3;P;D' file

Explanation:

  • The third white space character (space or tab) is replaced by a newline s/\s/\n/3
  • The string upto the first newline is printed P
  • The string upto the first newline is deleted D

    The D command has a split personality. If there is no newline it deletes the string and the next line is read in. If, however, a newline exists, it deletes the string upto the newline and then the cycle is started on the same string until no newlines exist.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll give you the best answer if you explain to me how that command works (it worked btw) –  Raymosrunerx May 12 '12 at 3:46
    
See explanation –  potong May 12 '12 at 6:18
add comment

This will work on the example you gave...

sed -e 's/\([^\t ]* [^\t ]* [^\t ]*\)[\t ]/\1\n/g'

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.