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I know I can multiply but being the lazy programming I am I do not want to.

Has anyone devised some sorcery to auto number the enums as powers of two?

Here's the example I have just to make it concrete:

[Flags]
private enum Targets : uint
{
    None = 0,
    Campaigns = 1,
    CampaignGroups = 2,
    Advertisers = 4,
    AdvertiserGroups = 8,
    AffiliateGroups = 16,
    Affiliates = 32,
    Creatives = 64,
    DetailedLeads = 128,
    DetailedSales = 256,
    ProgramLeads = 512,
    CreativeDeployments = 1024,
    CampaignCategories = 2048,
    Payouts = 4096,
    All = uint.MaxValue
}
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3  
Multiply the prior value by 2? –  Tim Medora May 11 '12 at 21:06
2  
easiest thing is to memorize them up to 2^64? –  JeremyWeir May 11 '12 at 21:07
4  
That's what calculators are for. You should use hex values just to stay practiced with multiplying base 16. :) –  IAbstract May 11 '12 at 21:08
    
Possible duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/8447/enum-flags-attribute (my first vote to close contained the wrong url) –  ChristopheD May 11 '12 at 21:12
1  
The only thing I don't like about these shortcuts is if you happen to save these enums in the database as ints. Then you have to get the calculator out a lot more than once to figure out what values correspond to which enum. –  JeremyWeir May 14 '12 at 6:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 58 down vote accepted

Write the values as shifted bits and let the compiler do the math:

[Flags]
private enum Targets : uint
{
    None                = 0,
    Campaigns           = 1,
    CampaignGroups      = 2 << 0,
    Advertisers         = 2 << 1,
    AdvertiserGroups    = 2 << 2,
    AffiliateGroups     = 2 << 3,
    Affiliates          = 2 << 4,
    Creatives           = 2 << 5,
    DetailedLeads       = 2 << 6,
    DetailedSales       = 2 << 7,
    ProgramLeads        = 2 << 8,
    CreativeDeployments = 2 << 9,
    CampaignCategories  = 2 << 10,
    Payouts             = 2 << 11,
    // etc.
}

James's suggestion is a good one, too. In fact I like this way even better. You could also write it like this:

[Flags]
private enum Targets : uint
{
    None                = 0,
    Campaigns           = 1 << 0,
    CampaignGroups      = 1 << 1,
    Advertisers         = 1 << 2,
    AdvertiserGroups    = 1 << 3,
    AffiliateGroups     = 1 << 4,
    // etc.
}
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11  
I do something similar except instead of 2, i use 1 << 1, 1 << 2, 1 << 3, etc. –  James Michael Hare May 11 '12 at 21:09
1  
Since the underlying type of your enum is uint, it's really 1u << 0, 1u << 1 etc. That might be important when you come to LastFlag = 1u << 31. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen May 11 '12 at 22:33
    
1 << n is shorthand for bit n. As in, if I wanted to set bits 2, 3, and 6 of a number, I'd set the number to (1 << 2) | (1 << 3) | (1 << 6). The number you shift by has direct correlation to the bit number you're operating on. –  indiv May 12 '12 at 0:40

Using hexadecimal notation is a little simpler than decimal notation as well (no calculator required):

[Flags]
private enum Targets : uint
{
    None                = 0,
    Campaigns           = 0x01,
    CampaignGroups      = 0x02,
    Advertisers         = 0x04,
    AdvertiserGroups    = 0x08,
    AffiliateGroups     = 0x10,
    Affiliates          = 0x20,
    Creatives           = 0x40,
    DetailedLeads       = 0x80,
    DetailedSales       = 0x100,
    ProgramLeads        = 0x200,
    CreativeDeployments = 0x400,
    CampaignCategories  = 0x800,
    Payouts             = 0x1000,
    // and the pattern of doubling continues
    // 0x2000
    // 0x4000
    // 0x8000
    // 0x10000
}

Not quite as elegant as Cody and James' solutions, but requires no calculator.

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I have seen this system widely used many times. so it is good to know it when you encounter code that uses it. I use 1<< personally –  v.oddou 2 days ago

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