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I have a simple if statement as such:

if ($('html').hasClass('m320')) {

// do stuff 

}

This works as expected. However, I want to add more classes to the if statement to check if any of the classes are present in the <html> tag. I need it so it's not all of them but just the presence of at least one class but it can be more.

My use case is that I have classes (e.g. m320, m768) added for various viewport widths so I only want to execute certain Jquery if it's a specific width (class).

Here is what i have tried so far:

1.

if ($('html').hasClass('m320', 'm768')) {

// do stuff 

}

2.

if ($('html').hasClass('m320')) || ($('html').hasClass('m768')) {

 // do stuff 

}

3.

 if ($('html').hasClass(['m320', 'm768'])) {

 // do stuff 

    }

None of these seem to work though. Not sure what I am doing wrong but most likely my syntax or structure.

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1  
Instead of guessing at how an API works, you should read the docs. api.jquery.com/hasclass Also, you should have your developer's console handy/open during developement. –  cliffs of insanity May 11 '12 at 22:03
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7 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You just had some messed up parentheses in your 2nd attempt.

var $html = $("html");

if ($html.hasClass('m320') || $html.hasClass('m768')) {

  // do stuff 

}
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect, thanks! –  Danny Englander May 11 '12 at 22:26
1  
You really should cache $('html') into a variable instead of having to look it up multiple times. –  epascarello May 11 '12 at 22:35
    
@epascarello Very true, updating the answer for posterity. –  James Montagne May 12 '12 at 0:07
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You could use is() instead of hasClass():

if ($('html').is('.m320, .m768')) { ... }
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Yeah hasClass() is probably faster but is() is way more convenient most of the time –  elclanrs May 11 '12 at 22:02
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For fun, I wrote a little jQuery add-on method that will check for any one of multiple class names:

$.fn.hasAnyClass = function() {
    for (var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++) {
        if (this.hasClass(arguments[i])) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

Then, in your example, you could use this:

if ($('html').hasAnyClass('m320', 'm768')) {

// do stuff 

}

You can pass as many class names as you want.


Here's an enhanced version that also lets you pass multiple class names separated by a space:

$.fn.hasAnyClass = function() {
    for (var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++) {
        var classes = arguments[i].split(" ");
        for (var j = 0; j < classes.length; j++) {
            if (this.hasClass(classes[j])) {
                return true;
            }
        }
    }
    return false;
}

if ($('html').hasAnyClass('m320 m768')) {
    // do stuff 
}

Working demo: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/uvtSA/

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent, this works well...cross-browser too! Tested on FF and IE. –  crmpicco Jan 23 '13 at 16:24
    
I made a slight mod to make it conform to the jQuery conventions for .addClass and .removeClass(). (stackoverflow.com/a/14887517/170456) –  CyberMonk Feb 15 '13 at 2:36
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This may be another solution:

if ($('html').attr('class').match(/m320|m768/)) {  
  // do stuff   
}  

according to jsperf.com it's quite fast, too.

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Here is a slight variation on answer offered by jfriend00:

$.fn.hasAnyClass = function() {
    var classes = arguments[0].split(" ");
    for (var i = 0; i < classes.length; i++) {
        if (this.hasClass(classes[i])) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

Allows use of same syntax as .addClass() and .removeClass(). e.g., .hasAnyClass('m320 m768') Needs bulletproofing, of course, as it assumes at least one argument.

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For anyone wondering about some of the different performance aspects with all of these different options, I've created a jsperf case here: jsperf

In short, using element.hasClass('class') is the fastest.

Next best bet is using elem.hasClass('classA') || elem.hasClass('classB'). A note on this one: order matters! If the class 'classA' is more likely to be found, list it first! OR condition statements return as soon as one of them is met.

The worst performance by far was using element.is('.class').

Also listed in the jsperf is CyberMonk's function, and Kolja's solution.

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Really interesting! I had no idea about jsperf. Thanks for illustrating all the different variations. –  Danny Englander Dec 11 '13 at 14:14
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var classes = $('html')[0].className;

if (classes.indexOf('m320') != -1 || classes.indexOf('m768') != -1) {
    //do something
}
share|improve this answer
    
If you're going to do that, why even bother using jquery to get the element? –  James Montagne May 11 '12 at 22:08
    
Well I would'nt, but at least it only gets the classes once? It just seemed so dull without a little jQuery, so I replaced getElementsByTagName with some jQ magic just for you! –  adeneo May 11 '12 at 22:17
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