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I'm working on Win7 and VS 2010.

My application calls LoadLibrary to load A.dll. LoadLibrary returns NULL and the error code is 126 which is my expectation.

Then if I leave my application alone, it will crash a few minutes later.

There is an error message in Windows Event Viewer :

Exception code: 0xc0000005

Faulting application path: MyApplication.exe

Faulting module path: A.dll

What happened?! I'm sure my application only call LoadLibrary once. How can error happen in an unloaded Dll?

Thanks ~

RESULT:

Thanks again for all the help.

Finally, I found the reason for the crash.

There was a thread which contained a message loop in A.dll. I forgot to make this thread exit before unloaded A.dll. The application didn't crash immediately because it blocked in GetMessage(). When it returned from GetMessage(), it crashed.

A.dll :

void ThreadFunc (void *) {
    while (true) Sleep(10000); // message loop

    return ;
}

extern "C" {
__declspec(dllexport) int init() {
    _beginthread(ThreadFunc, 0, NULL);
    return 0;
}
}

Application :

typedef int (*FUNC)();

HMODULE hMod = LoadLibrary(TEXT("A.dll"));
FUNC init = (FUNC) GetProcAddress(hMod, "init");

init();

Sleep(1000);  // wait for thread to sleep

BOOL freeRet = FreeLibrary(hMod);
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2  
What is error code 126 and why would you expect it? –  JaredPar May 11 '12 at 22:03
    
It's ERROR_MOD_NOT_FOUND which usually happens if LoadLibrary can't find your dll... I'd look at the logic which occurs if you can't call the exported functions you expect you should be able to.... –  Benj May 11 '12 at 22:15
    
A.dll will load B.dll which is not installed. So when my app loaded A.dll, LoadLibrary failed and GetLastError returned 126 which means "The specified module could not be found". –  compass00 May 11 '12 at 22:26
    
So you need to use a debugger. Tells you what DLL got loaded, tells you where it crashed, tells you why it crashed. There is no point trying to guess at a reason for this until you use one. –  Hans Passant May 12 '12 at 0:46

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