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On an ASP.NET MVC project we have several instances of data that requires good amount of resources and time to build. We want to cache them.

MemoryCache provides certain level of thread-safety but not enough to avoid running multiple instances of building code in parallel. Here is an example:

var data = cache["key"];
if(data == null)
{
  data = buildDataUsingGoodAmountOfResources();
  cache["key"] = data;
}

As you can see on a busy website hundreds of threads could go inside the if statement simultaneously until the data is built and make the building operation even slower, unnecessarily consuming the server resources.

There is an atomic AddOrGetExisting implementation in MemoryCache but it incorrectly requires "value to set" instead of "code to retrieve the value to set" which I think renders the given method almost completely useless.

We have been using our own ad-hoc scaffolding around MemoryCache to get it right however it requires explicit locks. It's cumbersome to use per-entry lock objects and we usually get away by sharing lock objects which is far from ideal. That made me think that reasons to avoid such convention could be intentional.

So I have two questions:

  • Is it a better practice not to lock building code? (That could have been proven more responsive for one, I wonder)

  • What's the right way to achieve per-entry locking for MemoryCache for such a lock? The strong urge to use key string as the lock object is dismissed at ".NET locking 101".

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3 Answers 3

up vote 21 down vote accepted

We solved this issue by combining Lazy<T> with AddOrGetExisting to avoid a need for a lock object completely. Here is a sample code (which uses infinite expiration):

public T GetFromCache<T>(string key, Func<T> valueFactory) 
{
    var newValue = new Lazy<T>(valueFactory);
    // the line belows returns existing item or adds the new value if it doesn't exist
    var value = (Lazy<T>)cache.AddOrGetExisting(key, newValue, MemoryCache.InfiniteExpiration);
    return (value ?? newValue).Value; // Lazy<T> handles the locking itself
}

That's not complete. There are gotchas like "exception caching" so you have to decide about what you want to do in case your valueFactory throws exception. One of the advantages, though, is the ability to cache null values too.

share|improve this answer
1  
Nicely done. +1 –  Neil Whitaker Apr 10 '13 at 18:15
1  
@atconway here is the excerpt from AddOrGetExisting documentation: "Return Value: If a cache entry with the same key exists, the existing cache entry; otherwise, null." –  ssg May 8 '13 at 18:51
2  
if key doesn't exist newValue.Value is called (because value will be null) populating it. otherwise value.Value is called which returns existing value. what's wrong about it? return value will give a compile error because both have the type of Lazy<T>. you have to return .Value for both options. –  ssg May 8 '13 at 19:26
3  
AddOrGetExisting should be cast to as Lazy<T>. Otherwise, nice one! –  Daniel Lidström Sep 6 '13 at 6:11
1  
You could specify LazyThreadSafetyMode.PublicationOnly in the Lazy<T> constructor to avoid caching exceptions (if desired). –  TrueWill Nov 11 '13 at 17:45

For the conditional add requirement, I always use ConcurrentDictionary, which has an overloaded GetOrAdd method which accepts a delegate to fire if the object needs to be built.

ConcurrentDictionary<string, object> _cache = new
  ConcurrenctDictionary<string, object>();

public void GetOrAdd(string key)
{
  return _cache.GetOrAdd(key, (k) => {
    //here 'k' is actually the same as 'key'
    return buildDataUsingGoodAmountOfResources();
  });
}

In reality I almost always use static concurrent dictionaries. I used to have 'normal' dictionaries protected by a ReaderWriterLockSlim instance, but as soon as I switched to .Net 4 (it's only available from that onwards) I started converting any of those that I came across.

ConcurrentDictionary's performance is admirable to say the least :)

Update Naive implementation with expiration semantics based on age only. Also should ensure that individual items are only created once - as per @usr's suggestion. Update again - as @usr has suggested - simply using a Lazy<T> would be a lot simpler - you can just forward the creation delegate to that when adding it to the concurrent dictionary. I'be changed the code, as actually my dictionary of locks wouldn't have worked anyway. But I really should have thought of that myself (past midnight here in the UK though and I'm beat. Any sympathy? No of course not. Being a developer, I have enough caffeine coursing through my veins to wake the dead).

I do recommend implementing the IRegisteredObject interface with this, though, and then registering it with the HostingEnvironment.RegisterObject method - doing that would provide a cleaner way to shut down the poller thread when the application pool shuts-down/recycles.

public class ConcurrentCache : IDisposable
{
  private readonly ConcurrentDictionary<string, Tuple<DateTime?, Lazy<object>>> _cache = 
    new ConcurrentDictionary<string, Tuple<DateTime?, Lazy<object>>>();

  private readonly Thread ExpireThread = new Thread(ExpireMonitor);

  public ConcurrentCache(){
    ExpireThread.Start();
  }

  public void Dispose()
  {
    //yeah, nasty, but this is a 'naive' implementation :)
    ExpireThread.Abort();
  }

  public void ExpireMonitor()
  {
    while(true)
    {
      Thread.Sleep(1000);
      DateTime expireTime = DateTime.Now;
      var toExpire = _cache.Where(kvp => kvp.First != null &&
        kvp.Item1.Value < expireTime).Select(kvp => kvp.Key).ToArray();
      Tuple<string, Lazy<object>> removed;
      object removedLock;
      foreach(var key in toExpire)
      {
        _cache.TryRemove(key, out removed);
      }
    }
  }

  public object CacheOrAdd(string key, Func<string, object> factory, 
    TimeSpan? expiry)
  {
    return _cache.GetOrAdd(key, (k) => { 
      //get or create a new object instance to use 
      //as the lock for the user code
        //here 'k' is actually the same as 'key' 
        return Tuple.Create(
          expiry.HasValue ? DateTime.Now + expiry.Value : (DateTime?)null,
          new Lazy<object>(() => factory(k)));
    }).Item2.Value; 
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, very nice but lacks expiration semantics. –  ssg May 11 '12 at 22:26
    
Could you not implement that on top? A monitor thread that polls the contents, expiring items that go out of date could do it. You could even hide it behind the same ObjectCache abstract base that MemoryCache uses. One of the cool things about ConcurrentDictionary is that it's multiple reader, single-writer. A polling thread can scan at the same time as another retrieves. Once the list of items to be expired is compiled, they can all be done in turn, and the readers automatically wait. –  Andras Zoltan May 11 '12 at 22:37
    
This will allow multiple items to be constructed concurrently and all of one of the will be discarded. ConcurrentDictionary does not call user code under a lock. –  usr May 11 '12 at 22:48
2  
Use a Lazy<T> as the value. –  usr May 11 '12 at 23:07
2  
@usr, couldn't resist, went for a cigarette and updated per your suggestion to use Lazy<T>, from my phone. I'll be using that pattern myself a lot more from now on too I think! –  Andras Zoltan May 11 '12 at 23:29

Here is a design that follows what you seem to have in mind. The first lock only happens for a short time. The final call to data.Value also locks (underneath), but clients will only block if two of them are requesting the same item at the same time.

public DataType GetData()
{      
  lock(_privateLockingField)
  {
    Lazy<DataType> data = cache["key"] as Lazy<DataType>;
    if(data == null)
    {
      data = new Lazy<DataType>(() => buildDataUsingGoodAmountOfResources();
      cache["key"] = data;
    }
  }

  return data.Value;
}
share|improve this answer
    
We resolved that issue without using a lock, it's very close to your idea I'll post it now. –  ssg Apr 9 '13 at 6:24

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