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I am working on some code that filters text before it is sent further into a program (this code removes everything but all alphanumeric characters and and underscores), the code itself works perfectly except for the fact that I cannot find a way to store the output of of it for use in other parts of the program, If i had to guess, this probably involves saving the stdout from putchar into a variable, but i cannot find much info for doing so online, if someone could point me in the right direction for this I would really appreciate it, thanks!

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <ctype.h>
int main(void) {
    int i;
    char *p;
    char stg[] = "hello";
        for (p = &stg[0]; *p != '\0'; p++) {
           if (isalnum(*p) || *p == '_') {
           putchar (*p);
           }
        }
        putchar ('\n');
    return 0;
}
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2  
Why not simply save the characters that satisfy the condition? What use do you want to make of the output? –  PALEN May 11 '12 at 23:25
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Perhaps I don't understand your "need" to use putchar() while doing the filtering, but you can filter the input into an output array of chars to use however needed after the filtering as shown below.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <ctype.h>

int main(void) {
    int i;
    char *p;
    char stg[] = "hel123*^_lo";
    char output[200] = {0x00};
    int index = 0;


    p = stg;
    while( *p )
    {
        if (isalnum(*p) || *p == '_')
        {
            output[index++] = (char)putchar(*p);
        }       
        p++;
    }
    putchar('\n');
    printf("[%s]\n", output);
    return 0;
}

Output:

hel123_lo
[hel123_lo]

EDIT:

And if you want to just filter the string into an array without displaying the string using putchar() you'd do something like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <ctype.h>

int main(void) {
    int i;
    char *p;
    char stg[] = "hel123*^_lo";
    char output[200] = {0x00};
    int index = 0;


    p = stg;
    while( *p )
    {
        if (isalnum(*p) || *p == '_')
        {
            output[index++] = *p;
        }       
        p++;
    }

    printf("[%s]\n", output);
    return 0;
}

And what exactly are you trying to do with the output of the filtered text?

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perfect, was just what I was looking for (concerning the how to output the info to an array), one question though, if I wanted to simply save the output of the code without displaying it at the time (so nothing would be printed out to the screen, but instead just be saved to the array) how would I go about doing something like that? Relatively new to C so not concrete on everything yet, my apologies if these are obvious questions, thanks! –  lacrosse1991 May 12 '12 at 0:01
    
and for the purpose of the output, this will be between the rest of a program and the clients that use the server, mostly as a safety mechanism to help to prevent people from sending the server malicious input –  lacrosse1991 May 12 '12 at 0:02
    
Glad I could help you out. I edited my answer to show how to filter the string into an array without using putchar(). If I've been helpful, please accept my answer and let me know if you have any further questions. –  Chimera May 12 '12 at 0:12
    
neat :) yep made it very clear as to how that works, one question though, when you had output[index++] what does the "index" do? –  lacrosse1991 May 12 '12 at 0:19
    
The index is variable that is incremented every time a new character is being added to the output array. It specifies what "position" or where in the array to put the next character. Here is a picture of what the array output looks like: | | | | | | <--- array with spaces for data Now with the index numbers of each spot: |0|1|2|3|4|5| So the following code would put "Hello" into the array: output[0] = 'H' output[1] = 'e' output[2] = 'l' output[3] = 'l' output[4] = 'o' output[5] = '\0' So the index variable starts at 0 and gets incremented after each character is put into the array. –  Chimera May 12 '12 at 13:48
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putchar -- int putchar( int ch ); -- returns the character you wrote if successful, EOF if failure.

Nothing prevents you from declaring an int variable, whether a scalar variable, an array element, or a field in a struct, and saving what you wrote. Take note, the return is an int, not a char.

Based on what you've written, you'll probably have to write some code to manage all the outputs you save. In other words, if I'm interpreting your question correctly, you'll be doing more than just saving what you wrote to a variable. You'll probably want to say where in the code you executed the putchar and perhaps even the time. Just guessing though.

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