Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

As per the man page /proc/pid/exe is a symlink containing the actual path of the executed command..

when I run valgrind on my program, I see that /proc/pid/exe points to /usr/lib64/valgrind/amd64-linux/memcheck

lnx-host> which valgrind
/usr/bin/valgrind

Any idea why /proc/pid/exe points to usr/lib64/valgrind/amd64-linux/memcheck when I am invoking it as valgrind ?

In my code I am trying to get the executable name from the pid, and in this case expecting to see valgrind.

share|improve this question
    
its not, I already checked that.. -rwxr-xr-x 1 root root 40020 Apr 13 2006 /usr/bin/valgrind –  Santhosh May 12 '12 at 2:07
    
the valgrind binary is just a frontend, it'll figure out what to do, and exec the actual tool, in your case memcheck –  nos May 12 '12 at 2:09
    
@nos, is there anyway I can directly call memcheck then ? The requirement I have is after the program has been invoked, I have to find the program name from pid and I am expecting /proc/pid/exe will match how the user actually invoked it (ofcourse /proc/pid/exe will be the full path) –  Santhosh May 12 '12 at 2:12
    
@Santhosh: I'm a bit confused, your question is like asking to see gcc when invoking it, and being surprised that the backends are called something completely different for the different compilation phases. –  0xC0000022L May 12 '12 at 2:17
    
In the general case, no, the user could've invoked a shell script that did various stuff and finally executed somethng, or in this case it the executable itself launches another tool - and the information about what the user invoked is gone. In the special case of the user invoking your own executable directly, /proc/pid/exe would be it. –  nos May 12 '12 at 2:18

1 Answer 1

memcheck is the default tool used by Valgrind, unless you tell it to use another of the tools, such as callgrind.

Use --tool=<name> to specify the tool you want to invoke.

Side-note: is your /usr/bin/valgrind also a script just like it is by default? Why not play with that to do what you want to achieve? On my system that invokes first of all /usr/bin/valgrind.bin and then the respective (backend) tool (/usr/lib/valgrind/memcheck-amd64-linux).


Relevant output from strace:

execve("/usr/bin/valgrind", ["valgrind", "./myprog"], [/* 35 vars */]) = 0
stat("/home/user/HEAD/myprog", {st_mode=S_IFDIR|0755, st_size=4096, ...}) = 0
execve("/usr/bin/valgrind.bin", ["/usr/bin/valgrind.bin", "./myprog"], [/* 39 vars */]) = 0
open("./myprog", O_RDONLY)              = 3
execve("/usr/lib/valgrind/memcheck-amd64-linux", ["/usr/bin/valgrind.bin", "./myprog"], [/* 40 vars */]) = 0
getcwd("/home/user/HEAD/myprog", 4095) = 25
open("./myprog", O_RDONLY)              = 3
stat("./myprog", {st_mode=S_IFREG|0755, st_size=1886240, ...}) = 0
readlink("/proc/self/fd/3", "/home/user/HEAD/myprog/myprog", 4096) = 31
readlink("/proc/self/fd/3", "/home/user/HEAD/myprog/myprog", 4096) = 31
open("./myprog", O_RDONLY)              = 3
write(1015, "./myprog", 8)              = 8
write(1016, "==23547== Command: ./myprog\n", 28==23547== Command: ./myprog
stat("/home/user/HEAD/myprog/myprog", {st_mode=S_IFREG|0755, st_size=1886240, ...}) = 0
open("/home/user/HEAD/myprog/myprog", O_RDONLY) = 3
stat("/home/user/HEAD/myprog/myprog", {st_mode=S_IFREG|0755, st_size=1886240, ...}) = 0
open("/home/user/HEAD/myprog/myprog", O_RDONLY) = 3
open("/home/user/HEAD/myprog/myprog", O_RDONLY) = 3
readlink("/proc/self/fd/3", "/home/user/HEAD/myprog/myprog", 4096) = 31
getcwd("/home/user/HEAD/myprog", 4096) = 25
lstat("/home/user/HEAD/myprog/myprog", {st_mode=S_IFREG|0755, st_size=1886240, ...}) = 0
open("/home/user/HEAD/myprog/datafile", O_RDONLY) = 3
access("/home/user/HEAD/myprog/datafile", F_OK) = 0
open("/home/user/HEAD/myprog/datafile", O_RDONLY) = 3
open("/home/user/HEAD/myprog/datafile", O_RDONLY) = 4

You'll notice that all execve calls are not referring to ./myprog but instead to the Valgrind wrapper script, the binary and then the backend tool:

execve("/usr/bin/valgrind", ["valgrind", "./myprog"], [/* 35 vars */]) = 0
execve("/usr/bin/valgrind.bin", ["/usr/bin/valgrind.bin", "./myprog"], [/* 39 vars */]) = 0
execve("/usr/lib/valgrind/memcheck-amd64-linux", ["/usr/bin/valgrind.bin", "./myprog"], [/* 40 vars */]) = 0
share|improve this answer
    
I understand that.. but when I call valgrind a.out, /proc/pid/exe is supposed to be a symblink to /usr/bin/valgrind, no ? –  Santhosh May 12 '12 at 2:10
    
No, it's a symlink to the actual binary that runs. strace will shed light on what's going on. After all memcheck acts like an emulator and therefore is the program running your program. Btw: in this case your question is not very precise. –  0xC0000022L May 12 '12 at 2:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.