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Initially data is this:

dict = {<User: user2>: {'diff': 48, 'alike': 1}, <User: user3>: {'diff': 42, 'alike': 2}, <User: user4>: {'diff': 45, 'alike': 1}, <User: user5>: {'diff': 43, 'alike':
 2}, <User: user6>: {'diff': 46, 'alike': 1}, <User: user7>: {'diff': 46, 'alike': 1}, <User: user8>: {'diff': 49, 'alike': 1}, <User: user9>: {'diff': 50, 'ali
ke': 0}, <User: user10>: {'diff': 46, 'alike': 1}, <User: user11>: {'diff': 37, 'alike': 3}, <User: user12>: {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}, <User: user13>: {'diff':
50, 'alike': 0}, <User: user14>: {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}, <User: user15>: {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}, <User: user16>: {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}, <User: user17>: {
'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}, <User: user18>: {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}, <User: user19>: {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}, <User: user20>: {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}}

Then I sort it:

sorted(dict) == [{'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}, {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}, {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}, {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}, {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}, {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}, {'d
    iff': 50, 'alike': 0}, {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}, {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}, {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}, {'diff': 45, 'alike': 1}, {'diff': 46, 'alike': 1}, {'diff'
    : 46, 'alike': 1}, {'diff': 46, 'alike': 1}, {'diff': 48, 'alike': 1}, {'diff': 49, 'alike': 1}, {'diff': 42, 'alike': 2}, {'diff': 43, 'alike': 2}, {'diff': 37
    , 'alike': 3}]

How do I sort it by "diff"?

share|improve this question
4  
That's not a dict, that's a list of dicts. – Gareth Latty May 12 '12 at 2:52
    
@Lattyware it start off as a dict, then i used sorted(dict), and i get that result – Yao Chen May 12 '12 at 3:16
up vote 8 down vote accepted

For one, you are not sorting a dict - you are sorting a list of dicts - these are very different things, not least as a dict in Python has no defined order.

You can do this easily with sorted() and operator.itemgetter():

import operator
sorted_dicts = sorted(dicts, key=operator.itemgetter("diff"))

The sorted() builtin takes the key keyword argument, which is a function which takes the value, and gives another value to sort on. Here we use an itemgetter() to get the desired value from the dict to sort by.

Edit:

Given your change, there are two answers, as you are being unclear. If you want the list of values, it's simply a case of extracting them from your original dict:

sorted(users.values(), key=operator.itemgetter("diff"))

Which is as simple as taking dict.values(). Naturally, under Python 2.x, you will want to use viewitems() or iteritems() for good performance.

If you want to sort the dict itself, it's a different matter, as dicts (as I stated) are inherently unordered.

First of all, I would like to note that sorted(dict) does not produce the output you suggested - a dict iterates over the keys, not the values by default:

users = {
    '<User: user10>': {'alike': 1, 'diff': 46},
    '<User: user11>': {'alike': 3, 'diff': 37},
    '<User: user12>': {'alike': 0, 'diff': 50},
    '<User: user13>': {'alike': 0, 'diff': 50},
    '<User: user14>': {'alike': 0, 'diff': 50},
    '<User: user15>': {'alike': 0, 'diff': 50},
    '<User: user16>': {'alike': 0, 'diff': 50},
    '<User: user17>': {'alike': 0, 'diff': 50},
    '<User: user18>': {'alike': 0, 'diff': 50},
    '<User: user19>': {'alike': 0, 'diff': 50},
    '<User: user20>': {'alike': 0, 'diff': 50},
    '<User: user2>': {'alike': 1, 'diff': 48},
    '<User: user3>': {'alike': 2, 'diff': 42},
    '<User: user4>': {'alike': 1, 'diff': 45},
    '<User: user5>': {'alike': 2, 'diff': 43},
    '<User: user6>': {'alike': 1, 'diff': 46},
    '<User: user7>': {'alike': 1, 'diff': 46},
    '<User: user8>': {'alike': 1, 'diff': 49},
    '<User: user9>': {'alike': 0, 'diff': 50}
}

print(sorted(users))

Gives us:

['<User: user10>', '<User: user11>', '<User: user12>', '<User: user13>', '<User: user14>', '<User: user15>', '<User: user16>', '<User: user17>', '<User: user18>', '<User: user19>', '<User: user20>', '<User: user2>', '<User: user3>', '<User: user4>', '<User: user5>', '<User: user6>', '<User: user7>', '<User: user8>', '<User: user9>']

To produce a sorted dict, we need to use collections.OrderedDict():

import collections

users = {
    '<User: user10>': {'alike': 1, 'diff': 46},
    '<User: user11>': {'alike': 3, 'diff': 37},
    '<User: user12>': {'alike': 0, 'diff': 50},
    '<User: user13>': {'alike': 0, 'diff': 50},
    '<User: user14>': {'alike': 0, 'diff': 50},
    '<User: user15>': {'alike': 0, 'diff': 50},
    '<User: user16>': {'alike': 0, 'diff': 50},
    '<User: user17>': {'alike': 0, 'diff': 50},
    '<User: user18>': {'alike': 0, 'diff': 50},
    '<User: user19>': {'alike': 0, 'diff': 50},
    '<User: user20>': {'alike': 0, 'diff': 50},
    '<User: user2>': {'alike': 1, 'diff': 48},
    '<User: user3>': {'alike': 2, 'diff': 42},
    '<User: user4>': {'alike': 1, 'diff': 45},
    '<User: user5>': {'alike': 2, 'diff': 43},
    '<User: user6>': {'alike': 1, 'diff': 46},
    '<User: user7>': {'alike': 1, 'diff': 46},
    '<User: user8>': {'alike': 1, 'diff': 49},
    '<User: user9>': {'alike': 0, 'diff': 50}
}

print(collections.OrderedDict(sorted(users.items(), key=lambda x: x[1]["diff"])))

Which gives us:

OrderedDict([('<User: user11>', {'diff': 37, 'alike': 3}), ('<User: user3>', {'diff': 42, 'alike': 2}), ('<User: user5>', {'diff': 43, 'alike': 2}), ('<User: user4>', {'diff': 45, 'alike': 1}), ('<User: user10>', {'diff': 46, 'alike': 1}), ('<User: user7>', {'diff': 46, 'alike': 1}), ('<User: user6>', {'diff': 46, 'alike': 1}), ('<User: user2>', {'diff': 48, 'alike': 1}), ('<User: user8>', {'diff': 49, 'alike': 1}), ('<User: user20>', {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}), ('<User: user9>', {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}), ('<User: user13>', {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}), ('<User: user19>', {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}), ('<User: user12>', {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}), ('<User: user18>', {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}), ('<User: user15>', {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}), ('<User: user14>', {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}), ('<User: user17>', {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0}), ('<User: user16>', {'diff': 50, 'alike': 0})])

Note that here we had to use a lambda statement for the key argument, as an itemgetter() unfortunately can't get multiple levels of items for us.

share|improve this answer
1  
Missing a right paren on the end of that line. – Joel Cornett May 12 '12 at 2:55
    
@JoelCornett Cheers, fixed. – Gareth Latty May 12 '12 at 2:56
    
I tried to fix it myself and forgot that edits had to be >6 chars. Anyway +1 – Joel Cornett May 12 '12 at 2:59
    
please check my stuff again, i added some more details... thank you! – Yao Chen May 12 '12 at 3:20
    
@yaojiang I'll update the answer this time, but please don't update the question after people have given answers. Give an example that actually fits what you want at the beginning - it's rude to do otherwise. – Gareth Latty May 12 '12 at 14:16
sorted(your_list, key=lambda el: el["diff"])

The key keyword argument should be a function that takes an element of the list you are sorting and returns the value that should be used in the sort comparison. lambda is shorthand for def - that is, it defines a function (with several limitations). The same line could be written this way:

def get_key(el):
    return el["diff"]

sorted(your_list, key=get_key)
share|improve this answer
    
@agf - absolutely! Explanation added! – Sean Vieira May 12 '12 at 2:58
    
please check my stuff again, i added some more details... thank you! – Yao Chen May 12 '12 at 3:20

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