Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

In dotNet a line throws an exception and is caught, how can I figure out which line in which file threw the exception? Seems relatively straightforward, but I can't figure it out...

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can only do it if you have debug symbols available.

catch(Exception ex) {
    // check the ex.StackTrace property
}

If you want to debug such a situation in VS, you'd better just check Thrown checkbox for Common Language Runtime Exceptions in Exceptions dialog located in Debug menu. The debugger will break as soon as the exception is thrown, even if it's in a try block.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the correct answer. –  Timwi Nov 7 '09 at 12:00

Personally, I just log the exception's ToString() return value. The whole stack trace is included. It's one line of code ... dead simple.

share|improve this answer

You could use the StackFrame Class:

try
{
    ...
    ...

}
catch(...)
{
    StackFrame sf = new StackFrame(true);

    int lineNumber = sf.GetFileLineNumber();
    int colNumber = sf.GetFileColumnNumber();
    string fileName = sf.GetFileName();
    string methodName = sf.GetMethod().Name;
}
share|improve this answer
4  
Note however that this will return the information for the 'catch' clause... not where the exception was thrown, for that you need to check the contents of the 'StackTrace' property of the exception you caught! –  jerryjvl Jun 29 '09 at 0:47
    
This answer is wrong, for the reasons jerryjvl has stated. How can this be accepted as correct? –  Timwi Nov 7 '09 at 11:59

Well, in .NET you have whats called a FirstChanceException. These essentially are thrown before an exception is handled. There are two ways of looking at the issue that you're presenting here. One is from a debugging angle. If debugging you can just set your debugger to catch thrown exceptions from the Debug/Exceptions window. This is easier in an interactive context. IF you need to record this information from within a non-interactive context then I would do something similar to what CMS is talking about...

try
{
    ...
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    System.Diagnostics.StackTrace stackTrace = new System.Diagnostics.StackTrace(ex);
    System.Diagnostics.StackFrame firstFrame = stackTrace.GetFrame[0];
    Console.WriteLine(firstFrame.GetFileLineNumber);
    ...
}

The only difference here is that we get the entire Stack Trace, then go to the first frame, which is where the exception was originally thrown.

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't frame 0 the frame current method, not where the error originated? –  Mike Rosenblum Jun 29 '09 at 1:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.