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I have a class hierarchy like the following:

class Alpha {
    public function initialize() {
        $class = get_class($this);
        $family = array( $class );
        while( ($class = get_parent_class($class)) !== false ) {
            $family[] = $class;
        }
        $family = array_reverse($family);
        foreach($family as $className) {
            // call $className's start (instance) method
        }
    }

    public function start() {
        echo "calling start from Alpha\n";
    }
}

class Beta extends Alpha {
    public function start() {
        echo "calling start from Beta\n";
    }
}

class Charlie extends Beta {
    public function start() {
        echo "calling start from Charlie\n";
    }
}

$c = new Charlie();
$c->initialize();

Alpha's initialize method should call the derived class's start method as well as all of the derived class's ancestor classes' start methods all the way back to Alpha's start method. The code should produce the following output:

calling start from Alpha
calling start from Beta
calling start from Charlie

However, I can't seem to figure out how to call an instance method of a specific ancestor class specified by the $className variable.

I've used call_user_func(array($className, 'start')) but this causes the start method to be treated like a static function. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
How are these three classes related? – Rocket Hazmat May 12 '12 at 5:30
1  
I can't see any hierarchy at all... – uttam May 12 '12 at 5:33
    
Why do you want to avoid parent::start()? That's kinda how "hierarchy" works. Also, in your example, the three classes are just three separate classes, there's no "hierarchy" here. – Rocket Hazmat May 12 '12 at 5:40
    
Pretty sure, you can't do this without parent::start(). Alpha doesn't know what classes extend from it, and I don't think you can query that. – Rocket Hazmat May 12 '12 at 6:33
    
Thanks Sergey for understanding what I meant and not what I wrote :). Sorry folks, I updated the question. The reason I want to avoid parent::start() is because I would have to use it in all of the classes. I'm looking for code that I only need in the base class that will call all of the derived classes' start methods. I could potentially have a Delta, Elephant, Foxtrot, etc. class as well. – threed May 12 '12 at 6:34
up vote 2 down vote accepted

In class function call like Classname::start should call Classname's function start not static call

class Alpha {

    public $myvar = 0;

    public function initialize() {

        $class = get_class($this);
        $family = array( $class );
        while( ($class = get_parent_class($class)) !== false ) {
            $family[] = $class;
            $this->myvar ++;
        }
        $family = array_reverse($family);
        foreach($family as $className) {
            // call $className's start method
            eval("{$className}::start();");
        }
    }

    public function start() {
        echo "{$this->myvar} calling start from Alpha\n";
    }
}

class Beta extends Alpha {
    public function start() {
        echo "{$this->myvar} calling start from Beta\n";
    }
}

class Charlie extends Beta {
    public function start() {
        echo "{$this->myvar} calling start from Charlie\n";
    }
}

$c = new Charlie();
$c->initialize();
share|improve this answer
    
Why are you using eval? The '::' calls the method statically, which is the same as call_user_func(array($className, 'start')), which he doesn't want. – Rocket Hazmat May 12 '12 at 7:28
    
This does work. While I generally try to avoid using eval(), if I can't find another solution that allows me to call the start methods as instance methods, I will probably resort to this. – threed May 12 '12 at 7:34
    
@threed: This solution is exactly the same as call_user_func(array($className, 'start')), (or call_user_func($className.'::start'))which you said you didn't want to do. – Rocket Hazmat May 12 '12 at 7:35
1  
@Rocket, I think it is: calling a function with the exact parent class – Sergey May 12 '12 at 7:47
1  
Perhaps this will help (though it's a bit confusing) http://www.php.net/manual/en/keyword.paamayim-nekudotayim.php. The :: operator does not always indicate a static reference. – threed May 12 '12 at 7:47
class Alpha {
    public function initialize() {
        // ... call all 'start' methods in class hierarchy starting with highest level     class (Alpha's start method) and ending with lowest derived class
    }

    public function start() {
        echo "calling start from Alpha\n";
    }
}

class Beta extends Alpha {
    public function start() {
        echo "calling start from Beta\n";
        parent::start();
    }
}

class Charlie extends Beta {
    public function start() {
        echo "calling start from Charlie\n";
        parent::start();
    }

    public function initialize() {
        $this->start();
    }
}

$c = new Charlie();
$c->initialize();
share|improve this answer
    
One of the requirements is that Alpha's initialize method should do the calling of all the start methods. – threed May 12 '12 at 6:49

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