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I am a linguist (attempting some data mining of the Latin language) but am rather new to programming.

I have a file constituted like this:

cerycium:cerycia
cessatio:cessatio
    cessatione
cessicius:cessicia
cessio:cessio
    cessione
    cessionem
    cessioni

and I need it organized like this:

cerycium:cerycia
cessatio:cessatio
cessatio:cessatione
cessicius:cessicia
cessio:cessio
cessio:cessione
cessio:cessionem
cessio:cessioni

Could anyone kindly offer a scipt (bash, regexp, python, whatever) that might do this for me? Thank you!

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closed as not a real question by Li-aung Yip, Sergio Tulentsev, mpapis, Perception, talonmies May 13 '12 at 4:37

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Is the indentation made from spaces or tabs? Is it consistent throughout? –  DerfK May 12 '12 at 6:10
4  
Stack Overflow is not your personal research assistant. You need to at least make some token effort in the direction of solving your own problem. –  Li-aung Yip May 12 '12 at 6:11

4 Answers 4

awk 'BEGIN {FS = OFS = ":"} NF == 1 {gsub(/[[:space:]]/, ""); $2 = $1; $1 = root} {root = $1; print}' inputfile

Which assumes that the first line will have both fields.

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simplified version of Dennis script:

awk -F: 'NF==2 {root=$1; print $1":"$2;} NF==1 {gsub(/\s+/,""); print root":"$1;}' a.txt

or with matching instead of counting:

awk -F: '/:/ {root=$1; print $1":"$2;} /^\s+/ {gsub(/\s+/,"");print root":"$1;}' a.txt
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python: If the first line has both fields

with open('in.txt') as f:
    lines=f.readlines()
for i,x in enumerate(lines):
    if ':' in x:
        lines[i]=x.strip()
    else:
         lines[i]=lines[i-1].split(':')[0]+':'+x.strip()

print("\n".join(lines))

output:

    cerycium:cerycia
    cessatio:cessatio
    cessatio:cessatione
    cessicius:cessicia
    cessio:cessio
    cessio:cessione
    cessio:cessionem
    cessio:cessioni
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Try this in perl: File Name: process.pl

#!/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

open (READ_FILE, "infile");
my @fcontent = <READ_FILE>;
close (READ_FILE);

our $prefix = ""; 
foreach(@fcontent) {
    if(grep(/:/, $_)) {
        my @tokens = split(":", $_);
        $prefix = $tokens[0];
    } else {
        $_ =~ s/\s+//;
        $_= "$prefix:$_";
    }
    print $_;
}

open (WRITE_FILE, ">outfile");
foreach(@fcontent) {
    print WRITE_FILE $_;
}
close (WRITE_FILE);

On command prompt:

perl process.pl 

Then open outfile to see the result.. I have simplified the program, mainly for better readability and you can edit later as you want.

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use appropriate file handle to write.You opened WRITE_FILE handle But,you wrote to the(unopened file handle) WRITEFILE.It doesn't make any sense.Be pratice to use use strict and use warning or -w . –  sat May 12 '12 at 7:12
    
@sat: Thank you for pointing out. Updated the post now. –  TheCottonSilk May 12 '12 at 7:24
    
I have you seen the output.why the first line come like this. :cerycium:cerycia .That means,first character is : (colon) .I think you have to add some condition in else block.That is,if(length($prefix) == 0) { $_ = "$prefix"; } else {$_= "$prefix:$_";}. –  sat May 12 '12 at 8:14
    
I see correct output as expected. You can check your input file. –  TheCottonSilk May 12 '12 at 9:26

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