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This is the first array:

$possible_combinations = array(
    1 => array(1),
    2 => array(2),
    3 => array(3),
    4 => array(4),

    5 => array(1, 2),
    6 => array(1, 3),
    7 => array(1, 4),       

    8 => array(2, 3),
    9 => array(2, 4),       

    10 => array(3, 4),

    11 => array(2, 3, 4),
    12 => array(1, 3, 4),
    13 => array(1, 2, 4),
    14 => array(1, 2, 3),

    15 => array(1, 2, 3, 4)
);

This is the second array:

$seeking = array(2, 3, 4);

As you can see $possible_combinations[11] matches $seeking.

The value of $seeking in this case is 2, 3, 4 but it may be different at other times. How can I run a check against the $possible_combinations array to see if the $seeking array matches any of the values of that associative array. It should return the key of the match if there is one.

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Are you looking for the first occurrence or all possible matches? –  Spero.ShiroPetto May 12 '12 at 7:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use PHP's built-in array_search() function for this.

$search = array_search($seeking,$possible_combinations);

if ($search !== FALSE) {
    echo 'Found at ' . $search;
} else {
    echo 'Not Found';
}

http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.array-search.php

share|improve this answer
    
This is incorrect. What happens if $seeking is found at index 0? It should instead read: if ($search !== FALSE) –  rdlowrey May 12 '12 at 6:53
    
There was no index 0 in his example, but fixed anyways. Thanks! –  Tushar May 12 '12 at 6:55
3  
Just gotta protect the people who drive by and copy/paste in the future :) –  rdlowrey May 12 '12 at 6:58
    
array_search() will return the first match if found. –  Spero.ShiroPetto May 12 '12 at 7:00

"any of the values of that associative array"

You don't have any associative arrays in your question. $possible_combinations is a multi-dimensional array. Nevertheless, you can use in_arraydocs:

var_dump(in_array(array(2, 3, 4), $possible_combinations)); // true

If you need to know at what index the needle is found in the haystack, use array_search as mentioned by the other answers. Oh, and also note that array_search can return zero, so you should verify that it's return value !== FALSE when you're checking the result.

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yeah I meant to say multidimensional array not associative. Although isn't it also an associative array since it doesn't start at zero index? –  TK123 May 12 '12 at 6:53
    
No, that does not make it an associative array. It's really just semantics anyway as PHP stores associative arrays in the exact same way as numerically indexed arrays. Under the hood they're all the same. –  rdlowrey May 12 '12 at 6:55

I would say, use array_search:

var_dump(array_search($seeking, $possible_combinations, true));

It returns the key if found, and FALSE otherwise. So make sure to use === to compare, i.e.

if (false !== ($key = array_search($seeking, $possible_combinations, true))) {
    echo "Found here: $key";
}
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array_keys() Find all possible key matches. array_search() Will return first occurrence.

var_dump(array_keys($possible_combinations, $seeking, true));

Will match both 0 & 11 assuming

$possible_combinations = array(
     0 => array(2, 3, 4),
    ...
    11 => array(2, 3, 4),
);

$seeking = array(2, 3, 4);

Output:

array
  0 => int 0
  1 => int 11
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