Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is a static class also protected? since no object can be instantiated and it must be inherited. I just want to make sure that no way possible to access the Socket members unless it directly communicates with the ServerSocket

i.e.

//Socket.cpp    
static class Socket {
   Socket();
   Socket(PORT);
   ~Socket();
   int create();
   int bind();
   int listen();
   int connect();
   int close();
   int send(char* data);
   int recv(char* data);
};

//ServerSocket.cpp
class ServerSocket : private Socket {
   ServerSocket();
   ServerSocket(PORT);
   ~ServerSocket();
   close();
   send(char* data);
   recv(char* data);
};

// main.cpp
int main() {
     ServerSocket socket(30000);

     socket.send("Hello World");
     socket.close();

     return 0;
};
share|improve this question
    
You could easily try and test your code to answer this question yourself. –  EdChum May 12 '12 at 9:13

1 Answer 1

I think you're confusing things here? Coming from a Java background? In C++ a "static class" is more like just another way to define a namespace. It's nothing you should use to limited accessibility on class members (cause they're essentially no "real" class members).

To be a bit more precise: The use of your keyword won't affect the resulting code at all. What is considered a "static class" is usually a class with static members only.

The way you use the static keyword works due to the simple fact that you're able to define a class and objects at the same time:

static class ClassOfStaticObject {
    ClassOfStaticObject() {
        // ...
    }
} myObject;

This would be the same as this:

class ClassOfStaticObject {
    ClassOfStaticObject() {
        // ...
    }
};
static ClassOfStaticObject myObject;

To achieve what you'd like to do, all you have to do is making your base class abstract by having pure virtual function members:

class Socket {
    Socket(void);
    Socket(PORT);
    ~Socket(void);
    // ...
    virtual int send(const char *data) = 0;
    virtual int recv(const char *data) = 0;
}

This will no longer allow you to create an instance of this class or any derived class unless that class implements those virtual methods. As an alternative you could hide all constructors as private or protected.

To restrict visibility of base classes' members, you can use private or protected like you did already, however I'd suggest using public instead and then declaring those members you'd like to access from children only (i.e. not from outside) as protected.

class Socket {
protected:
    Socket(void);
    Socket(PORT);
    ~Socket(void);
    // ...
    virtual int send(const char *data) = 0;
    virtual int recv(const char *data) = 0;
    void something_protected();
public:
    void something_debug(void);
}

class ServerSocket : public Socket {
    // ...
}

This way, you'll be able to call something_debug() on objects of class ServerSocket, but you won't be able to call something_protected() from outside nor will you be able to create objects of class Socket.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.