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I'm having a few issues trying to encode a string to UTF-8. I've tried numerous things, including using string.encode('utf-8') and unicode(string), but I get the error:

UnicodeDecodeError: 'ascii' codec can't decode byte 0xef in position 1: ordinal not in range(128)

This is my string:

(。・ω・。)ノ

I don't see what's going wrong, any idea?

Edit: The problem is that printing the string as it is does not show properly. Also, this error when I try to convert it:

Python 2.7.1+ (r271:86832, Apr 11 2011, 18:13:53)
[GCC 4.5.2] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> s = '(\xef\xbd\xa1\xef\xbd\xa5\xcf\x89\xef\xbd\xa5\xef\xbd\xa1)\xef\xbe\x89'
>>> s1 = s.decode('utf-8')
>>> print s1
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
UnicodeEncodeError: 'ascii' codec can't encode characters in position 1-5: ordinal not in range(128)
share|improve this question
    
Show some code! Where is this string coming from? –  Daniel Roseman May 12 '12 at 7:46
    
It's just a normally inserted string. The same happens when I just try printing it. –  Markum May 12 '12 at 7:53
    
I meet the same when pip install, and fix it from here: [install some devel][1] [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/17931726/… –  DienBell Sep 7 '13 at 3:30
    
+1 for the input string! –  Jesus Oct 17 '14 at 11:17

7 Answers 7

up vote 33 down vote accepted

This is to do with the encoding of your terminal not being set to UTF-8. Here is my terminal

$ echo $LANG
en_GB.UTF-8
$ python
Python 2.7.3 (default, Apr 20 2012, 22:39:59) 
[GCC 4.6.3] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> s = '(\xef\xbd\xa1\xef\xbd\xa5\xcf\x89\xef\xbd\xa5\xef\xbd\xa1)\xef\xbe\x89'
>>> s1 = s.decode('utf-8')
>>> print s1
(。・ω・。)ノ
>>> 

On my terminal the example works with the above, but if I get rid of the LANG setting then it won't work

$ unset LANG
$ python
Python 2.7.3 (default, Apr 20 2012, 22:39:59) 
[GCC 4.6.3] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> s = '(\xef\xbd\xa1\xef\xbd\xa5\xcf\x89\xef\xbd\xa5\xef\xbd\xa1)\xef\xbe\x89'
>>> s1 = s.decode('utf-8')
>>> print s1
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
UnicodeEncodeError: 'ascii' codec can't encode characters in position 1-5: ordinal not in range(128)
>>> 

Consult the docs for your linux variant to discover how to make this change permanent.

share|improve this answer

My +1 to mata's comment at http://stackoverflow.com/a/10561979/1346705 and to the Nick Craig-Wood's demonstration. You have decoded the string correctly. The problem is with the print command as it converts the Unicode string to the console encoding, and the console is not capable to display the string. Try to write the string into a file and look at the result using some decent editor that supports Unicode:

import codecs

s = '(\xef\xbd\xa1\xef\xbd\xa5\xcf\x89\xef\xbd\xa5\xef\xbd\xa1)\xef\xbe\x89'
s1 = s.decode('utf-8')
f = codecs.open('out.txt', 'w', encoding='utf-8')
f.write(s1)
f.close()

Then you will see (。・ω・。)ノ.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is a cute one :) –  User007 Oct 19 '12 at 22:01
    
Worked for me - thank you –  mactwixs Feb 4 '14 at 10:04
    
Great, thank you –  cgl Dec 26 '14 at 19:39

try:

string.decode('utf-8')  # or:
unicode(string, 'utf-8')

edit:

'(\xef\xbd\xa1\xef\xbd\xa5\xcf\x89\xef\xbd\xa5\xef\xbd\xa1)\xef\xbe\x89'.decode('utf-8') gives u'(\uff61\uff65\u03c9\uff65\uff61)\uff89', which is correct.

so your problem must be at some oter place, possibly if you try to do something with it were there is an implicit conversion going on (could be printing, writing to a stream...)

to say more we'll need to see some code.

share|improve this answer
    
Both return UnicodeEncodeError: 'charmap' codec can't encode characters in position 1-5: character maps to <undefined> –  Markum May 12 '12 at 7:54
    
please post repr(string) –  mata May 12 '12 at 7:56
    
'(\xef\xbd\xa1\xef\xbd\xa5\xcf\x89\xef\xbd\xa5\xef\xbd\xa1)\xef\xbe\x89' –  Markum May 12 '12 at 7:57
1  
All I'm trying to do is print the original string in its original format, but I get (´¢í´¢Ñ¤ë´¢Ñ´¢í)´¥ë. –  Markum May 12 '12 at 8:20
4  
the string is utf8-encoded. if you print it, it just wirites the bytes to the output stream, and if your terminal doesn't interpret it as utf8 you end up with garbage. with decode you convert it to unicode, then you can encode it again to an encoding your terminal understands. –  mata May 12 '12 at 8:29

If you are working on a remote host, look at /etc/ssh/ssh_config on your local PC.

When this file contains a line:

SendEnv LANG LC_*

comment it out with adding # at the head of line. It might help.

With this line, ssh sends language related environment variables of your PC to the remote host. It causes a lot of problems.

share|improve this answer

It looks like your string is encoded to utf-8, so what exactly is the problem? Or what are you trying to do here..?

Python 2.7.3 (default, Apr 20 2012, 22:39:59) 
[GCC 4.6.3] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> s = '(\xef\xbd\xa1\xef\xbd\xa5\xcf\x89\xef\xbd\xa5\xef\xbd\xa1)\xef\xbe\x89'
>>> s1 = s.decode('utf-8')
>>> print s1
(。・ω・。)ノ
>>> s2 = u'(。・ω・。)ノ'
>>> s2 == s1
True
>>> s2
u'(\uff61\uff65\u03c9\uff65\uff61)\uff89'
share|improve this answer
    
Printing the original string as is gives (´¢í´¢Ñ¤ë´¢Ñ´¢í)´¥ë, I want it to encode properly. –  Markum May 12 '12 at 8:15

No problems with my terminal. The above answers helped me looking in the right directions but it didn't work for me until I added 'ignore':

fix_encoding = lambda s: s.decode('utf8', 'ignore')
share|improve this answer
    
This is wrong, you're forcing your encoding lambda function to ignore the encoding itself which means you're losing characters. –  Maximiliano Rios Jun 22 '14 at 2:27

i solve that problem changing in the file settings.py with 'ENGINE': 'django.db.backends.mysql', don´t use 'ENGINE': 'mysql.connector.django',

share|improve this answer
    
@rayryeng Could you explain the reason for your edit? It appears to completely change the meaning of what the OP wrote, from recommending a particular setting to recommending against it. –  Andrew Medico Jun 30 '14 at 21:16
    
@AndrewMedico - My apologies. I saw that this post was very similar to another one so I believed that they were the same. I will revert back. –  rayryeng Jun 30 '14 at 21:26

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