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I cant seem to append to a particular id & class. I want HEllow world to be Appened to only 1st

<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript" src="jquery.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function(){
  $("button").click(function(){
var id =94;
    $("#'id',.m").append(" <b>Hello world!</b>");
  });
});
</script>
</head>
<body>
<p id="94" class="postitem m" >This is a paragraph.</p>
<p id="94" >This is another paragraph.</p>
<button>Insert content at the end of each p element</button>
</body>
</html>
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1  
Two problems: 1. id values must be unique on the page. 2. Note that your id values are invalid for CSS. id values for use with CSS must start with a letter. Since jQuery uses CSS selectors for finding elements, I'd strongly recommend using valid ones. (Those IDs are also invalid for HTML4, but HTML5 allows them. Just not CSS.) –  T.J. Crowder May 12 '12 at 8:28
    
@T.J.Crowder is that true even with HTML5, which does allow numeric IDs ? –  Alnitak May 12 '12 at 8:29
    
@Alnitak: Yes. The HTML5 spec defines what's valid in HTML5, not what's valid in CSS. If you try to use an all-numeric id value with, say, querySelectorAll and you're not in quirks mode, you'll get a selector exception. –  T.J. Crowder May 12 '12 at 8:29
    
don't use the same ID on more than one element. It's against the DOM rules, and causes exactly the problem you're having. –  Alnitak May 12 '12 at 8:29
    
@T.J.Crowder thanks - worth knowing. I knew HTML5 allowed it but it hadn't occurred to me that they'd still be invalid in CSS. –  Alnitak May 12 '12 at 8:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Two problems:

  1. id values must be unique on the page. You're using the same id for two different elements.

  2. Your id values are invalid for CSS. id values for use with CSS must start with a letter. Since jQuery uses CSS selectors for finding elements, I'd strongly recommend using valid ones. (Those IDs are also invalid for HTML4, but HTML5 allows them. Just not CSS.)

If you correct both of those problems, you'll be fine. Note that if you have unique ids, you don't need the "m" class anymore unless you were using it for something else.

<html>
<head>
<script class="jsbin" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="jquery.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function(){
  $("button").click(function(){
    var id = 'x94';
    $("#" + id).append(" <b>Hello world!</b>");
  });
});
</script>
</head>
<body>
<p id="x94" class="postitem m" >This is a paragraph.</p>
<p id="x95" >This is another paragraph.</p>
<button>Insert content at the end of each p element</button>
</body>
</html>

Live example | source


Separately: I strongly recommend adding a doctype to that HTML. Without one, you're in quirks mode, and jQuery doesn't support quirks mode (various calculations will be wrong).

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1  
+1 Thanks for pointing out the issue with my answer; mistakenly thought there was a hierarchy :) –  Ja͢ck May 12 '12 at 8:51
    
@Jack: We've all done it... :-) –  T.J. Crowder May 12 '12 at 8:54

Then it must be like this

$('#'+id+'.m').append('<b>Hello world!</b>');

which is $('#94.m') with no spaces to mean that both id and class must exist to match

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