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I created a function that receives chunked HTTP packages using StreamReader and TcpClient. Here's what I've created:

    private string recv()
    {
        Thread.Sleep(Config.ApplicationClient.WAIT_INTERVAL);

        string result = String.Empty;
        string line = reader.ReadLine();

        result += line + "\n";

        while (line.Length > 0)
        {
            line = reader.ReadLine();
            result += line + "\n";
        }

        for (int size = -1, total = 0; size != 0; total = 0)
        {
            line = reader.ReadLine();
            size = PacketAnalyzer.parseHex(line);

            while (total < size)
            {
                line = reader.ReadLine();
                result += line + "\n";
                int i = encoding.GetBytes(line).Length;
                total += i + 2; //this part assumes that line break is caused by "\r\n", which is not always the case
            }
        }

        reader.DiscardBufferedData();

        return result;
    }

For each new line it reads, it adds an additional length of 2 to total, assuming that the new line is created by "\r\n". This works for almost all cases except when the data contains '\n', which I have no idea how to differentiate it from "\r\n". For such cases, it'll think that it has read more than there actually is, thereby short reading a chunk and exposing PacketAnalyzer.parseHex() to error.

SOLVED: I made the following two line-reading and stream-emptying functions and I'm back on track again.

    NetworkStream ns;

    //.....

    private void emptyStreamBuffer()
    {
        while (ns.DataAvailable)
            ns.ReadByte();
    }

    private string readLine()
    {
        int i = 0; 
        for (byte b = (byte) ns.ReadByte(); b != '\n'; b = (byte) ns.ReadByte())
            buffer[i++] = b;

        return encoding.GetString(buffer, 0, i);
    }
share|improve this question
2  
Don't use a StreamReader. Read directly from the stream. –  Ben May 12 '12 at 9:28
    
Just to clarify: You'd like to track the amount of bytes read, but you're never sure whether the line was delimited by \n or \n\r? –  Mario May 12 '12 at 9:28
    
@Mario Yes you are correct –  Kenny May 12 '12 at 9:30
1  
Would be the best approach. Don't combine readers reformatting/interpreting contents (here: line breaks) with code expecting exact lengths to be read. –  Mario May 12 '12 at 9:34
1  
If you are reading chunked data you need to read it with the chunked data rules not text rules. Then once you have read it you can convert it to whatever you want. –  Ben May 12 '12 at 9:42

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