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Is there way to animate each letter in a word separately, using only CSS?

I guess it's possible to do, using javascript/jquery, iterating over the word as an array of letters.

But here I'm looking for an easy way out..

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What have you done? –  user1432124 May 12 '12 at 10:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Whether you do it with CSS or JavaScript, you (or some library) are going to have to put each letter in its own element in order to animate them individually. E.g.:

<p>Hi there</p>

...will need to become

<p><span>H</span><span>i</span><span> </span><span>t</span><span>h</span><span>e</span><span>r</span><span>e</span></p>

That leads me to think a JavaScript solution might be preferred, as otherwise your markup will be a bit...unpleasant to write.

With JavaScript using jQuery, it's quite easy to replace the text of an element with a bunch of spans containing that text character-by-character:

var target = $("#target");
target.html(target.text().replace(/./g, "<span>$&</span>"));

Then you animate the spans. (Note I'm assuming here that the element in question contains only text, not text and child elements. It's more complex if you have child elements.)

Here's a very basic example:

HTML:

<p id="target" style="margin-top: 20px">Hi there</p>

JavaScript:

jQuery(function($) {

  var target = $("#target");
  target.html(target.text().replace(/./g, "<span>$&</span>"));

  setTimeout(runAnimation, 250);

  function runAnimation() {
    var index, spans;

    index = 0;
    spans = target.children();
    doOne();

    function doOne() {
      var span = $(spans[index]);
      if (!$.trim(span.text())) {
        // Skip blanks
        next();
        return;
      }

      // Do this one
      span.css({
        position: "relative",
      }).animate({
        top: "-20"
      }, "fast").animate({
        top: "0"
      }, "fast", function() {
        span.css("position", "");
        next();
      });
    }

    function next() {
      ++index;
      if (index < spans.length) {
        doOne();
      }
      else {
        setTimeout(runAnimation, 500);
      }
    }
  }

});

Live copy | source

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I'm afraid thats the only way to go. :/ –  BSG May 12 '12 at 10:24
    
+'d, but it would be a greater + if there was a little Fiddle for the OP to play with :) –  Zuul May 12 '12 at 10:36
    
Thank you for your effort. :) –  BSG May 12 '12 at 10:56
    
@BSG: No worries, glad that helped. I did up the little example for fun. :-) –  T.J. Crowder May 12 '12 at 10:57

It isn't possible with ONLY CSS (not until there's an nth-letter spec that gets accepted). In the meantime you can use lettering.js http://letteringjs.com/ to wrap each letter in a span then animate each of those independently.

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Thanks. I'll look in to that aswell. –  BSG May 12 '12 at 19:06

The technique T.J. Crowder described is very good, but it's not working for more sophisticated cases. The white space into the spans disappears and this may lead to some problems. If you set the display of the spans to inline-block ( you need it, to animate some properties ) you end up with one long word. So this technique is great for simple fade in/out animations, but for more advanced cases I would recommend https://github.com/jschr/textillate/blob/master/jquery.textillate.js this jQuery plugin.

P.S.

I modified mr. Crowder code so it works fine with whitespaces:

var target = $("#test");
target.html( target.text().replace(/./g, "<span>$&</span>").replace(/\s/g, "&nbsp;"));

I animated it using TweenMax staggerFromTo() method and works fine for me.

Here are some demos: http://blog.bassta.bg/2013/05/text-animation-with-tweenmax/

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