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I am working on "LINQ to Objects" library for C++11. I would like to do smth like this:

// filtering elements by their value
arr.where( [](double d){ return d < 0; } )

// filtering elements by their value and position
arr.where( [](double d, int i){ return i%2==0; } )

I down want to write arr.where_i( ... ) - it's ugly. So i need function/method overloading by lambda-type...

This is my solution:

template<typename F>
auto my_magic_func(F f) -> decltype(f(1))
{
    return f(1);
}

template<typename F>
auto my_magic_func(F f, void * fake = NULL) -> decltype(f(2,3))
{
    return f(2,3);
}

int main()
{
    auto x1 = my_magic_func([](int a){ return a+100; });
    auto x2 = my_magic_func([](int a, int b){ return a*b; });
    // x1 == 1+100
    // x2 == 2*3
}

Is it SFINAE solution? What can you suggest me?

share|improve this question
    
This solution works, but i need to know types of arguments to write my_magic_func. It is not comfortable. –  k06a May 12 '12 at 10:29
    
You might want to take a look at boost::range. –  Viktor Sehr May 12 '12 at 11:01
    
I am working on library with main target is to copy C# LINQ style... If you are interested, you can get it here: code.google.com/p/boolinq –  k06a May 12 '12 at 11:03
    
Ah, really cool! I'll bookmark it! –  Viktor Sehr May 12 '12 at 11:09
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2 Answers

Maybe something variadic:

#include <utility>

template <typename F, typename ...Args>
decltype(f(std::declval<Args>()...) my_magic_func(F f, Args &&... args)
{
    return f(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
}

Edit: You can also use typename std::result_of<F(Args...)>::type for the return type, which does the same thing.

share|improve this answer
1  
I am very sorry, but MSVC++2010 does not support variadic templates –  k06a May 12 '12 at 10:31
    
You can't use std::result_of. The way it's specified it doesn't guarantee that using it results in proper SFINAE, and in my experience you will hit hard errors in some cases (which means it deceptively appears to work the rest of the time). –  Luc Danton May 12 '12 at 13:57
    
-1 This entirely misses the point of the question. my_magic_func is supposed to be unary, not taking a parameter pack; it is supposed to detect the arity of the functor it's given and invoke it with different arguments accordingly. –  ildjarn May 12 '12 at 15:12
    
@ildjarn: Hm, yes, I misunderstood the question. –  Kerrek SB May 12 '12 at 17:39
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You certainly want SFINAE in your solution. Generally speaking, the result would look something like:

template<
    typename Functor
    , typename std::enable_if<
        special_test<Functor>::value
        , int
    >::type = 0
>
return_type
my_magic_func(Functor f);

template<
    typename Functor
    , typename std::enable_if<
        !special_test<Functor>::value
        , int
    >::type = 0
>
return_type
my_magic_func(Functor f);

such that only one overload would be active at any one time -- all that remains now is carefully crafting that special_test to have the behaviour we want. This is a careful balancing act as you don't want the test to be too specific; otherwise we lose generality. Quite a shame when writing generic code. You haven't given too much information (e.g. are you strictly interested in support for lambdas? monomorphic functors? polymorphic functors?), but I will assume for now that we have access to a value_type alias which would correspond to double in your example.

As such, here's an example condition that will check that a given type is Callable (that's a Standard concept) with signature bool(value_type); i.e. that it's a predicate of sorts:

template<typename Functor, typename ValueType>
struct is_unary_predicate {
    typedef char (&accepted)[1];
    typedef char (&refused)[2];

    void consume(bool);

    template<
        typename X
        , typename Y
        , typename = decltype( consume(std::declval<X>()(std::declval<Y>())) )
    >
    accepted
    test(X&&, Y&&);

    refused test(...);

    static constexpr bool value =
        sizeof test(std::declval<Functor>(), std::declval<ValueType>())
        == sizeof(accepted);
};

Personally I have an is_callable<F, Signature> trait so that I would only need to write something like template<typename Functor, typename ValueType> using is_unary_predicate = is_callable<Functor, bool(ValueType)>; (and similarly I could have an is_binary_predicate alias instead of letting the second overload of my_magic_func be a catch-all). Perhaps you'd want to use a similar trait for future uses of SFINAE (although it may be somewhat painful to write without variadic templates).

share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't accepted and refused be different sizes? –  ildjarn May 12 '12 at 14:23
    
@ildjarn Thanks, fixed. –  Luc Danton May 12 '12 at 14:26
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