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I know this is not the best nor the most efficient way to find prime numbers; However, I can't seem to find the reason why 169 counts as a prime number (for smaller numbers it works OK as far as I'm concerned).

public static int checkPrime(int num, int i)
{
    if (i == num)
        return 1;

    else
    {
        if (num % i == 0)
            return 0;
        else
            checkPrime(num, i+1);

    }

    return 1;
}

Main Class:

        System.out.println("Type a number");
        number = reader.nextInt();

        if ((number % 10) % 2 == 0)
            result = 0;

        else
            result = checkPrime(number, 2);

        if (result == 1 || number == 2)
            System.out.println(number + " is a prime number");
        else
            System.out.println(number + " is NOT a prime number");
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2  
Why are you returning an int, instead of a bool? –  CodesInChaos May 12 '12 at 10:42
7  
You also ignore the return value of your recursive call. –  CodesInChaos May 12 '12 at 10:43
    
If you are checking is some number a prime number, why are you checking others too? Just say if(number % divider == 0) .... –  MikkoP May 12 '12 at 10:45
    
You should run this in the debugger to discover where its behaviour diverges from what you expected. –  Oliver Charlesworth May 12 '12 at 10:46
    
Also, I believe you may also change to if (i*i >= num) return 1 since you do not need to check all divisors to be sure it is a prime, but only from 2 up to the square root of num. See Primality Test. This would resolve the problem in less recursive cycles. –  Edwin Dalorzo May 12 '12 at 11:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Replacing int by boolean for better expressiveness, and returning the value of the recursive call, your method looks like this:

public static boolean checkPrime(int num, int i)
{
    if (i == num)
        return true;    
    else
    {
        if (num % i == 0)
            return false;
        else
            return checkPrime(num, i+1);
    }
}

It still doesn't work for num < 2, it'll run until i overflows. So as your main prime checking function you can write something like:

public static boolean checkPrime(int num)
{
   if(num<2)
     return false;
   else
     return checkPrime(num, 2);
}

btw (number % 10) % 2 is equivalent to number % 2.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 beat me to it by a couple of seconds –  Bohemian May 12 '12 at 10:45
    
thanks for the fast reply :p –  amiregelz May 12 '12 at 10:48
1  
FYI, In Java it's boolean. –  st0le May 16 '12 at 5:58

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