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#!/usr/bin/perl 
use CGI ':standard';
use CGI::Carp qw(fatalsToBrowser); 
my $files_location; 
my $ID; 
my @fileholder;
$files_location = "C:\Users\user\Documents\hello\icon.png";
open(DLFILE, "<$files_location") ; 
@fileholder = <DLFILE>; 
close (DLFILE) ; 
print "Content-Type:application/x-download\n"; 
print "Content-Disposition:attachment;filename=$ID\n\n";
print @fileholder;

When I run this script, instead of returning the icon.png file it returns the download.pl (the name of the script given above) with no content inside it. What is the issue?

Script i am using currently.

#!C:\Perl64\bin\perl.exe -w 
use CGI qw(:standard);
use File::Copy qw( copy );
use File::Spec::Functions qw( catfile );
use constant IMG_DIR => catfile(qw(     D:\  ));
serve_logo(IMG_DIR);
sub serve_logo {
    my ($dir) = @_;

                my $cgi = CGI->new;

                my $file = "icon.png";
                #print $file;

                defined ($file)         or die "Invalid image name in CGI request\n";
                send_file($cgi, $dir, $file);


                return;
                }
sub send_file
  {
    my ($cgi, $dir, $file) = @_;
    my $path = catfile($dir, $file);
    open my $fh, '<:raw', $path         or die "Cannot open '$path': $!";
    print $cgi->header(         -type => 'application/octet-stream',         -attachment => $file,     ); 
    binmode STDOUT, ':raw';
     copy $fh => \*STDOUT, 8_192;      
    close $fh         or die "Cannot close '$path': $!";
    return;

} 
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There are quite a few issues. The first one is the fact that you are using @fileholder = <DLFILE>; to slurp a binary file. On Windows, automatic conversion of line endings will wreak havoc on the contents of that file.

Other issues are:

  1. You are not checking the return value of open. We don't even know if open succeeded.

  2. You never assign a value to $ID, meaning you're sending "filename=\n\n" in your response.

  3. You are slurping a binary file, making the memory footprint of your program proportional to the size of the binary file. Robust programs don't do that.

  4. You're useing CGI.pm, but you are neither using it nor have you read the docs.

  5. You're using a bareword (i.e. package global) filehandle.

The fundamental reason, however, is that open fails. Why does open fail? Simple:

C:\temp> cat uu.pl
#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict; use warnings;

my $files_location = "C:\Users\user\Documents\hello\icon.png";
print "$files_location\n";

Let's try running that, shall we?

C:\temp> uu
Unrecognized escape \D passed through at C:\temp\uu.pl line 5.
Unrecognized escape \h passed through at C:\temp\uu.pl line 5.
Unrecognized escape \i passed through at C:\temp\uu.pl line 5.
C:SERSSERDOCUMENTSHELLOICON.PNG

Here is a short script illustrating a better way:

use CGI qw(:standard);
use File::Copy qw( copy );
use File::Spec::Functions qw( catfile );

use constant IMG_DIR => catfile(qw(
    E:\ srv localhost images
));

serve_logo(IMG_DIR);

sub serve_logo {
    my ($dir) = @_;

    my %mapping = (
        'big' => 'logo-1600x1200px.png',
        'medium' => 'logo-800x600.png',
        'small' => 'logo-400x300.png',
        'thumb' => 'logo-200x150.jpg',
        'icon' => 'logo-32x32.gif',
    );

    my $cgi = CGI->new;

    my $file = $mapping{ $cgi->param('which') };
    defined ($file)
        or die "Invalid image name in CGI request\n";

    send_file($cgi, $dir, $file);

    return;
}

sub send_file {
    my ($cgi, $dir, $file) = @_;

    my $path = catfile($dir, $file);

    open my $fh, '<:raw', $path
        or die "Cannot open '$path': $!";

    print $cgi->header(
        -type => 'application/octet-stream',
        -attachment => $file,
    );

    binmode STDOUT, ':raw';

    copy $fh => \*STDOUT, 8_192;

    close $fh
        or die "Cannot close '$path': $!";

    return;
}

I also posted a detailed explanation on my blog.

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+1 :: Nice answer. –  Ωmega May 12 '12 at 11:55
    
sitepoint.com/file-download-script-perl is where i got the source from. It seems to be working fine for him. So how would i download this binary file in a robust manner. Any tutorials. –  user1092042 May 12 '12 at 11:55
    
Well, for some definition of working, you might be right. But, it is not my definition of working, and clearly, it doesn't work, or you would not have posted this question, right? Am I missing something here? That article and the advice contained therein is crap. –  Sinan Ünür May 12 '12 at 11:58
    
Looks like a text file gets copied but a binary file does not . There are errors. Do you know anyway of overcoming this issue so that i will be able to download all types of files. –  user1092042 May 12 '12 at 12:08
    
Even in the above program when i try to open a .png file it prints the content onto my browsers windows. Even if i copy paste this content into a file and rename as .png it says invalid file. Why is this happening. –  user1092042 May 12 '12 at 12:48
show 5 more comments

It took me a while to figure what was wrong, so for those that end up here (as I did) having random issues serving large files, here's my advice:

Avoid File::Copy, as it's bugged for this purpose. When serving data through CGI, syswrite can return undef ($! being 'Resource temporarily unavailable') for some time.

File::Copy stops in that case (returns 0, sets $!), failing to transfer the entire file (or stream).

Many different options to work around that, retrying the syswrite, or using blocking sockets, not sure which on is the best though !

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