Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a problem as stated below: i have an array(say) a[]={10,24,56,33,22,11,21} i have something like this

for(i=0;i<100;i++){
    if(a[i]==10)
        // do something
}

next when i=1

if(a[i]==10 && a[i+1]==24)

so on so at each iteration the arguments / conditions within if should be varying now this will be a very big sequence i cant explicitly write
if(a[i]==10 && a[i+1]==24 && a[i+2]==56 ...... a[i+100]=2322)

how can i achieve this varying conditions?

share|improve this question
2  
Your problem statement isn't clear. I suspect you have to use a loop in place of your if statement with many conditions. –  KingsIndian May 12 '12 at 11:38
    
Can we suppose the input shown isn't the real input or all of this would be out of the array bounds? –  pmr May 12 '12 at 11:38
1  
what's the objective of the program? –  Michael Buen May 12 '12 at 12:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have to have a cumulative "boolean" variable that checks a[i] at the i-th iteration and update that variable:

int a[] = {...};   /* array with some values to verify */
int v[] = {...};   /* these are the actual desired values in a[] */

/* the verifying loop */
int i;
int cond = 1;
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
{
    cond = cond && (a[i] == v[i]);
    if (cond)
    {
       /* do something */
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this! –  Rahul Reddy May 16 '12 at 6:55

I think that you should introduce a boolean value.

bool valid = true;

for(i=0;i<100;i++){
    if(a[i]==10 && valid)
        // do something
    else
    {
        valid = false;
        break;
    }
}

For every iteration, you need to change the value to which you are comparing a[i]

share|improve this answer
1  
boolean is not a C type. use bool or _Bool. –  Jens Gustedt May 12 '12 at 11:46
    
What's the point of valid, if you have to manually enter each value inside the loop? –  Eitan T May 12 '12 at 17:04

Have a loop within a loop:

for (i = 0; i != 100; ++i)
{
    int condition = 1;
    for (j = 0; i + j != 100 && condition; ++j)
    {
        condition = condition && (a[i + j] == /* your number */ );
    }
    if (condition) { /* ... */ }
}
share|improve this answer
    
C has a bool. –  Jens Gustedt May 12 '12 at 11:46
    
In the for (j = 0; i + j != 100; ++j) loop you can add optimization if (!condition) break;. Better practice is to use i < 100 rather than i != 100. –  gumik May 12 '12 at 12:03
    
And the condition must be 1 at the beginning. If it's 0 then it never will change to 1, –  gumik May 12 '12 at 12:05
    
This is not C++, you cannot declare the variable condition inside a for loop. –  Eitan T May 12 '12 at 12:26
2  
@ssjeitan: It might not be C++, but it’s still block-scoped. Variables can be defined at the beginning of any block in C, not just a function-scope block. –  Brian Nixon May 12 '12 at 12:32

In this case, you can use function pointers or blocks. You can find a good example here here

share|improve this answer

Seeing your examples, I think that the variations you are talking about is only in the length of array 'a' whose presence you want to check in some array x. If indeed it is so, memcmp can be of use to you.

Let me modify your example a bit to clarify what I am saying.

int a[7]={10,24,56,33,22,11,21} is the required values you want to check in some array 'x', with different lengths of 'a' each time, with 'x' declared as

int x[1000];

In that case, you could use memcmp as follow :-

for ( len = 1 ; len <= 7 ; ++len )
{ for ( i = 0 ; i <= 1000-len ; ++i )
  { if ( ! memcmp( a, x+i, len * sizeof(int) ) )
    { // do something
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.